Everett woman’s death ruled a homicide

EVERETT — A young woman found slain in south Everett on Saturday had a troubled life, but to the end there were people trying to help her.

Julia Lynn Randolph, of Everett, turned 24 last month.

Her body was reported found at 7 a.m. Saturday in a restaurant parking lot at the intersection of Highway 99 and Center Road.

Randolph died from blunt-force injuries to the head, according to the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office. Her death was ruled a homicide.

Snohomish County sheriff’s detectives Monday released few new details about the case.

No arrests had been made as of early Monday evening, sheriff’s spokeswoman Shari Ireton said. No suspect information was released, but police previously said they don’t believe there was any danger to the public in connection with the case.

Randolph had been in and out of the courts for much of the past dozen years, records show. Her parents, court officials and others repeatedly tried to get her help. She reportedly had mental illness and was addicted to drugs, and could become violent with those close to her.

Randolph was arraigned in Snohomish County Superior Court last week on a felony drug charge. She pleaded not guilty to methamphetamine possession and was released on her own recognizance. Trial was set for December.

She also pleaded not guilty in Everett Municipal Court on Sept. 4 for allegedly violating an order to stay out of a high-prostitution area. A hearing had been set for next week.

Randolph spent much of her youth living in Everett and attending local schools.

She was deemed an “at-risk youth” at 12 and was confined to juvenile detention nearly two dozen times by age 15.

As a teen, her criminal history was limited to low-level thefts, shoplifting and misdemeanor assault, court papers show. As an adult, most of her problems were street crimes.

A juvenile court assessment from 2004 said that her adoptive mother had worked hard to keep Randolph in counseling and on her mental-health medications. Her adoptive parents work in education and social services.

In 2011, she spent some time living with her adoptive parents while she tried to get a job and get clean, according to court papers. Her troubles made that impossible. In October 2011, her family sought a protection order to keep her from entering their house when they weren’t home.

Herald writer Diana Hefley contributed to this report.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com

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