Eyman makes $250,000 loan to push new anti-tax measure

Anti-tax promoter Tim Eyman has loaned $250,000 to his latest initiative campaign which would make tax hikes expire after a year unless tougher rules for raising taxes are written into the state constitution.

Eyman obtained the money by taking out a second mortgage on his Mukilteo home. He did the same thing in 2010 to propel Initiative 1053 to the ballot. That debt was paid off earlier this year, he said.

“It is not the ideal situation but it is necessary to get the ball rolling,” Eyman said this afternoon. “Every initiative needs seed money and there’s no doubt with the short time-frame that we’ll need money fast.”

Voters Want More Choices received the money April 29 according to reports filed with the state Public Disclosure Commission. It is currently listed as a cash donation but Eyman said the report will be amended to reflect that it is a loan.

Eyman’s latest initiative calls for advisory votes every fall to see if voters support or oppose a constitutional amendment to require any new tax be approved by at least a two-thirds majority of legislators.

The idea is if the public overwhelmingly supports such a change it will pressure lawmakers into pursuing it.

As an added element of pressure, the initiative would make any tax increase passed by lawmakers and not also put to a public vote would expire after a year. This requirement would go away if the two-thirds rule is put into the constitution.

To qualify, Eyman will need to turn in 246,372 valid signatures of registered voters by July 5. The Secretary of State’s Office recommends turning in 325,000 to allow for invalid signatures.

More in Local News

Man arrested after police find van full of drugs, cash and guns

An officer on patrol noticed a vehicle by itself in the middle of a WinCo parking lot at 2 a.m.

Jim Mathis, the Vietnam veteran whose Marysville garden was recently featured in The Herald, died Wednesday. Mathis, who suffered from PTSD and cancer, found solace in his beautiful garden. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Vietnam veteran Jim Mathis found peace in his garden

The Marysville man who served two tours died Wednesday after suffering from cancer and PTSD.

Smith Island habitat restoration cost to rise $1.2 million

The project is intended to increase survival rates for juvenile chinook salmon.

Add deputies and bump taxes a bit, executive proposes

Dave Somers’ Snohomish County budget proposal also would address traffic problems in neighborhoods.

County councilman proposes banning safe injection sites

Nate Nehring says county officials also should find “credible, long-term solutions to addiction.”

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

They chose the longshot candidate to fill a vacant seat

Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick will serve as representative for the 39th legislative district.

Alien brain? No, a colony of harmless freshwater creatures

Bryozoans are tiny invertebrates that live in jelly-like masses, and their presence is a good thing.

Definitely not Christmas in July for parched young trees

“I live in Washington. I should not have to water a Christmas tree,” says one grower. But they did.

Most Read