Eyman turns in petitions as opposition forms

Tim Eyman of Mukilteo today turned in signatures for Initiative 517, a measure that would increase time for collecting signatures, add penalties for harassing petitioners and prevent local governments from blocking votes on measures brought to them by residents.

Eyman said he turned in petitions containing 345,000 signatures of registered voters. He needs at least 241,153 be valid to qualify for the November ballot.

However, because I-517 is an initiative to the Legislature, it will be sent first to state lawmakers for consideration. They could adopt it as is though that is unlikely. They are more likely to not act on it and it will go onto the ballot. They also could craft an alternative to put on the ballot as a competing measure.

“We have 11 months for people to get to know the initiative,” he said. “We think it will be very popular.”

Joining Eyman at the Secretary of State’s Office this morning were the two men who funded and guided the collection of signatures for this measure – Paul Jacob, president of the Virginia-based Citizens in Charge Foundation, and Ed Agazarm, retired co-founder of Citizen Solutions, a professional signature-gathering firm.

Andrew Villeneuve of the Northwest Progressive Institute, a longtime Eyman nemesis, watched the trio speak to reporters then announced formation of a committee to fight the measure. Its name, he said, will be “Stop Tim Eyman’s Profit Machine.”

Villeneuve said if the initiative became law sponsors of initiatives would gain six additional months to gather signatures. That means petitioners could be out and about year-round which would make the business of initiatives and signature gathering more lucrative, he said.

“This initiative is just intended to make it easier and cheaper for people like Tim Eyman to do initiatives,” he said.

Villeneuve may not be the only foe. As I wrote today, the Washington Retail Association is worried the initiative could enable petitioners to be inside or outside any store in the state.

Eyman said that’s not the case. He said the measure is only aimed at changing state law to allow gathering of signatures inside and outside of public buildings

More in Local News

Young woman missing from Mukilteo found safe

She called her parents and told them she was at a museum in Seattle.

Mom and brother turn in suspect in Stanwood robberies

The man is suspected of robbing the same gas station twice, and apologizing to the clerk afterward.

Derrick “Wiz” Crawford, 22, is a suspect in the homicide of his roommate. (Edmonds Police Department)
Roommate suspected in Edmonds killing found hiding in closet

Police had been searching for him for 10 days before locating him at a house in Everett.

Video shows man suspected of attacking a woman in Edmonds

The man allegedly threw her on the ground, then ran away after the she began kicking and screaming.

Navy to put filter in Coupeville’s contaminated water system

Chemicals from firefighting foam was found in the town’s drinking water.

Officials to test sanity of suspect in Everett crime spree

He allegedly tried to rob and clobber a transit worker, then fled and struggled with police.

Katharine Graham, then CEO and chairwoman of the board of The Washington Post Co., looks over a copy of The Daily Herald with Larry Hanson, then The Herald’s publisher, during her visit to Everett on Sept. 20, 1984. The Washington Post Co. owned The Herald from 1978 until 2013. (Herald archives)
Everett’s brush with Katharine Graham, leader of ‘The Post’

Retired Herald publisher Larry Hanson recalls The Washington Post publisher’s visits.

Former Monroe cop loses appeal on sex crimes conviction

Once a highly respected officer, he was found guilty of secretly videotaping his kids’ babysitter.

Families seek to change wrongful death law

A bill would allow or parents or siblings who wish to pursue a suit for an unmarried, childless adult.

Most Read