Families and friends flock to Lynnwood’s first farmers market

LYNNWOOD — Plump, ruby-red strawberries, crunchy snap peas and that first brain-freeze bite of ice cream in the summer.

The treats were tempting as the new Lynnwood Farmers Market kicked off June 12 in Wilcox Park. The market runs from 3 to 7 p.m. today and every Thursday through Sept. 25.

People streamed into the park from all directions with strollers, toddlers and dogs in tow.

Mothers pushed babies on swings. Folks cradled bouquets of fresh flowers.

The air smelled like just-popped popcorn.

“This is four years in the making,” said city finance director Lorenzo Hines. “It’s nice to see it happen. This is beautiful.”

The Cedar Valley Community School choir sang “What A Wonderful World.”

The market is part of the city’s effort to promote exercise and healthy eating, said Mayor Nicola Smith. It is funded by a federal health grant.

Yah’leanah Calderon, 14, auditioned for the chance to perform OneRepublic’s “Life in Color,” she said.

“They wanted something lively, and I thought ‘Life in Color’ was perfect,” she said.

She just finished up at Alderwood Middle and is headed to Lynnwood High in the fall.

Marcy Freed and Louise Middleton enjoyed a quiet moment on a bench in the sunshine.

Their senior home is just up the street from the farmers market, they said.

“It’s great,” Middleton said. “We’re enjoying it.”

Freed had snagged some carpet cleaner and shampoo for her rescue dog, Curly, who’s named after a character in “The Three Stooges,” she said.

Right away at the market, Middleton ran into a friend of her son’s she hadn’t seen in a long time, she said.

Meanwhile, Isak Guillaume came with his parents to watch his sister, Sophie, 9, perform in the Cedar Valley choir.

Isak is excited about starting kindergarten next year, he said. He’s been in school “a little bit” but next year it will be “a lot of bit.”

He sifted through his goodie bag from one of the booths.

“I have a flasher,” he said, holding up a keychain flashlight. “And I have a sucker.”

“The kids are happy,” said his mother, Kelly Guillaume.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com.

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