Family of detained Lynnwood man appalled at Rodman

Associated Press

SEATTLE — The sister of a Lynnwood man imprisoned in North Korea says she’s worried that Dennis Rodman, who is in the country to celebrate the birthday of leader Kim Jong Un, is hurting efforts to free her brother.

Terri Chung said Wednesday his family couldn’t believe what Dennis Rodman has said about Kenneth Bae.

“Clearly, he’s uninformed and doesn’t know anything about Kenneth or his detainment. I don’t think he has any authority to speak or pass judgment on Kenneth, certainly,” Chung said.

In a CNN interview Tuesday, Rodman said he refused to discuss Bae with North Korean leaders and implied Bae may deserve his punishment. Rodman and other former NBA players played in an exhibition game Wednesday in Pyongyang and Rodman sang a verse from a birthday song to Kim.

Bae’s family has tried to reach Rodman or his agent in the past without success, Chung said.

“He made it clear he doesn’t want to help. My concern is he’s hurting the cause,” she said. “He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.”

Bae, 45, was arrested in November 2012 while leading a tour group. He was accused of crimes against the state and sentenced to 15 years hard labor. He was moved to a hospital last summer in poor health.

The State Department has told the family it’s doing everything it can, but Chung is not aware of anything in the works.

Bae was born in South Korea and immigrated to the United States in 1985 with his parents and sister. He attended the University of Oregon and lived in the Seattle suburb of Lynnwood, where his mother, Myunghee Bae, now lives. Chung lives in nearby Edmonds.

Bae was allowed to call home on Dec. 29 because of the holidays, Chung said.

It was the first time his three children from an earlier marriage have spoken to him, she said. He has two in Arizona and another in Hawaii, ages 17, 22 and 23, Chung said.

Before his arrest, Bae lived in China for seven years with his wife and stepdaughter. He ran a tour business and led 18 trips to North Korea, Chung said.

“He worked there legally. He had official permission to be there. He had business relations,” she said.

Nothing was amiss until his arrest, apparently related to his religion, she said.

“He is a man of faith and I’m afraid his Christian faith has been deemed hostile against the state,” Chung said.

The family is concerned about his health as well as his freedom. He has diabetes, an enlarged heart and a back injury that prevents him for standing more than 30 minutes at a time. They’re glad he’s in the hospital, rather than the labor camp, but want him released.

“We want him well and back home,” Chung said.

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