Five take buyout offers in Edmonds

EDMONDS — Five employees of the city of Edmonds will voluntarily leave their positions.

The city offered buyouts to its 200 employees in July. The one-time offer was to leave through retirement or resignation in exchange for three to six months salary or smaller cash incentives paired with health benefits. The offers were dependent on how long employees had worked for the city.

The city’s Voluntary Separation Incentive Program was started by Mayor Dave Earling. It closed in August and was an effort to balance an expected 2013 budget shortfall of $1.5 million, said Carrie Hite, human resources reporting director.

The city expects to save $575,491 in ongoing salaries and benefits, Hite added. The five employees represent nearly 83 years of service at the city and are from different departments including parks and recreation, finance, development services, police and the city’s wastewater treatment plant. Four employees are set to end their employment by the end of the year while the fifth plans to work until early next year, Hite said.

The Edmonds City Council unanimously approved the program Tuesday night. During the council meeting, a change in medical benefits for employees in 2013 and expected to save $333,000 was also approved.

A balanced 2013 city budget was presented to council members Oct. 16 and is expected to be adopted Nov. 20.

Amy Daybert: 425-339-3491; adaybert@heraldnet.com.

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