Foes launch challenge of charter school law

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Wednesday, February 27, 2013 2:22pm
  • Local News

Washington’s voter-approved charter school law is unconstitutional because it improperly diverts public school funds to private non-profits, opponents claim in a legal challenge launched today.

In a letter to Attorney General Bob Ferguson, the Washington Education Association, the League of Women Voters of Washington and El Centro de la Raza laid out seven reasons why they think the new law violates the state’s constitution.

“In sum, the Charter School Act is an unconstitutional law that impedes the State’s progress toward fully funding public education and places even greater pressure on school districts to fill this gap. The Attorney General should act now to ensure that the next generation of our children receives an adequate education. We therefore request that you pursue immediate measures to address the unconstitutional provisions of the Charter School Act,” the coalition concluded in its letter.

If Ferguson doesn’t act, the coalition plans to make its case to the state Supreme Court. In the past, Ferguson has said he would defend the voter-approved law from challenges.

You can read the letter here.

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