Free to good home: 1 huge piece of driftwood

EVERETT — Three miles from the mouth of the Snohomish River, debris washes up from time to time at Dagmars Marina in Everett.

A few months ago, high tides brought in a striking piece of driftwood — a tree stump and root system, about 12 feet wide and 9 feet around.

It’s also free to a good home.

The stump showed up in the boat ramp area near the front office, where the water depth ranges from shallow to deep, depending on the tides, said Kernan “Kerney” Manley, the manager at Dagmars, a 35-acre marina and moorage lot.

“We didn’t know what to do with it,” he said.

The crews moved the stump with an 80,000-pound forklift, the same piece of machinery they use for yachts. They set the stump out by the freeway, where it has become a bit of a curiosity for commuters on southbound I-5.

They figured it might make someone a nice yard decoration, said Manley, who has worked there for nearly 36 years.

At first, they watched the stump teeter, then added small pallets in places to keep it stable.

The “For Sale” sign was added this week, but that’s just to catch someone’s attention.

“I was hoping somebody would think, ‘Oh, I’ve got to have it,’ ” Manley said.

Stumps, branches and other debris play a key role in the ecosystems of rivers, streams and flood plains, said Bob Bilby, chief environmental scientist for the Weyerhaeuser Company and a University of Washington affiliate professor of environmental and forest sciences.

“It’s incredibly important,” he said.

In small streams, stumps and logs help shape the morphology of stream channels — where water pools and forms deep habitats for fish.

Wood also fixes gravel in place, which salmon use for spawning. It also catches pine needles and leaves that feed the insects that feed the fish.

The marina’s location at the nexus of the river and the freeway does attract the occasional oddity.

About a decade ago, a construction company that specialized in moving and demolishing buildings stored a two-story house near where the stump is now.

Traffic slowed as drivers stopped to look at the house, Manley said.

“People got mad about that,” he said. “We got phone calls for three days.”

A lot washes up from the river. They’ve seen tires and dead animals, including a llama once, Manley said.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com.

It can be yours

Anyone interested in owning the stump should call 425-259-6124.

More in Local News

Shock from WSU suicide ripples through Snohomish County

Roughly 1 in 10 seniors, sophomores and 8th-graders said they had attempted to take their own lives.

New leaders coming to county, state political parties

Hillary Moralez of Bothell takes over as chair for the Snohomish County Democratic Party.

Mom and brother turn in suspect in Stanwood robberies

The man is suspected of robbing the same gas station twice, and apologizing to the clerk afterward.

$1,000 reward for info on who killed an eagle near Snohomish

After being shot, the raptor was treated at the Sarvey Wildlife Center but died overnight.

Possible bobcat sighting keeps Snohomish students inside

The creature was spotted on the campus of Valley View Middle School around noon.

Derrick “Wiz” Crawford, 22, is a suspect in the homicide of his roommate. (Edmonds Police Department)
Roommate suspected in Edmonds killing found hiding in closet

Police had been searching for him for 10 days before locating him at a house in Everett.

Stabbing in Everett follows dispute between brothers-in-law

The victim, 54, was hospitalized. The suspect, 29, had not been apprehended Thursday.

Camano Island man gets 18 years for role in drug ring

He was convicted of helping lead a drug distribution network in four Washington counties.

Lake Stevens man missing since beginning of January

Jason Michael Knox White hasn’t used his credit card or withdrawn money from his bank since then.

Most Read