Highway 9 signal changes should improve traffic flow

Richard Quint of Lake Stevens writes: I’m wondering if something could be done about the eastbound Soper Hill Road signal at Highway 9. In the early morning hours of the commute, the vast majority of the traffic going eastbound on Soper Hill Road turns right onto Highway 9. Even though this traffic has its own merge lane, the signal is always stopping the Highway 9 traffic at even a shadow of a car from Soper Hill Road. It’s set up as if the secondary road has the priority light.

Could it be changed so that a car at least has to come to a stop on Soper Hill Road to trip the signal for Highway 9? This creates a lot of unnecessary stops and starts, wasted gas, brakes and time.

Tom Pearce, a spokesman for the state Department of Transportation, responds: Our signal operations engineers reviewed the operation of the signal on Highway 9 at Soper Hill Road and made some changes that should help the situation that Richard describes.

We increased the minimum length of the green light for traffic on Highway 9, and also increased how much time the signal waits between detecting vehicles before it changes the signal to green for traffic on Soper Hill Road. This will keep the light green on Highway 9 longer, making it a higher priority.

More Highway 9 news: From today through Friday, one lane in each direction of Highway 9 is scheduled to be closed between 212th Street SE and 180th Street SE in Clearview for drainage and median work. Northbound closures are planned for 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., southbound closures for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. each day from tonight through Friday morning, traffic is scheduled to alternate using one lane at the intersection of Highway 9 and 180th Street SE for crews to install traffic signal control loops.

Flaggers will control traffic through the intersection.

The state is spending $57.1 million to widen Highway 9 from 212th Street SE to 176th Street SE. Some merchants in the area have complained that the work is restricting access to their businesses. For more information, go to http://tinyurl.com/lxjf8sh or http://tinyurl.com/kua7mc7.

E-mail us at streetsmarts@heraldnet.com. Please include your city of residence.

Look for updates on our Street Smarts blog at www.heraldnet.com/streetsmarts.

More in Local News

Man arrested after police find van full of drugs, cash and guns

An officer on patrol noticed a vehicle by itself in the middle of a WinCo parking lot at 2 a.m.

Jim Mathis, the Vietnam veteran whose Marysville garden was recently featured in The Herald, died Wednesday. Mathis, who suffered from PTSD and cancer, found solace in his beautiful garden. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Vietnam veteran Jim Mathis found peace in his garden

The Marysville man who served two tours died Wednesday after suffering from cancer and PTSD.

Smith Island habitat restoration cost to rise $1.2 million

The project is intended to increase survival rates for juvenile chinook salmon.

Add deputies and bump taxes a bit, executive proposes

Dave Somers’ Snohomish County budget proposal also would address traffic problems in neighborhoods.

County councilman proposes banning safe injection sites

Nate Nehring says county officials also should find “credible, long-term solutions to addiction.”

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

They chose the longshot candidate to fill a vacant seat

Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick will serve as representative for the 39th legislative district.

Alien brain? No, a colony of harmless freshwater creatures

Bryozoans are tiny invertebrates that live in jelly-like masses, and their presence is a good thing.

Definitely not Christmas in July for parched young trees

“I live in Washington. I should not have to water a Christmas tree,” says one grower. But they did.

Most Read