House Democrats keep Dream Act alive in budget

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Wednesday, April 10, 2013 1:38pm
  • Local News

House budget writers apparently didn’t get the memo that the Dream Act is dead this legislative session.

They’ve included $100,000 for implementation of House Bill 1817 which would make undocumented immigrant students eligible for state financial aid. You can find it on page 167 of the budget bill.

The House passed the bill by a margin of 77-20. But it died in the Senate Higher Education Committee as the chairwoman, Sen. Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor said the state could not afford it.

And Senate Majority Leader Rodney Tom, D-Medina, has insisted it is dead as well.

But veterans of the legislative process know better than to pronounce any legislation dead until lawmakers adjourn.

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