I-522 backers concede, vow to try again in 2016

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Friday, November 15, 2013 9:08am
  • Local News

Efforts to require labeling of genetically-engineered foods are not over despite voters’ rejection of Initiative 522.

The Yes on 522 campaign conceded late Thursday but one of its leaders vowed they would try again in 2016.

“We are disappointed with the results, but the polling is clear that Washingtonians support labeling and believe they have a right to know,” Trudy Bialic, a co-chair of the Yes on 522 committee said in a statement. “This fight isn’t over. We will be back in 2016 to challenge and defeat the out-of-state corporations standing in the way of our right to know.”

As of this morning, the initiative was losing 51.4 percent to 48.6 percent.

Nearly $30 million got spent by the dueling sides in this campaign. Opponents shelled out $22 million which set a record in Washington for the most money expended to defeat a ballot measure.

In its statement, the Yes on 522 campaign cited opponents’ spending and a lower-than-expected voter turnout as two causes for their setback.

2013 general election turnout is the lowest ever recorded, skewing older and more conservative, and away from younger, more progressive voters driving the GE labeling movement. These “off-year” election results depict how viable a Washington state GMO labeling ballot measure would be in a presidential election cycle with much higher, younger, and more progressive voter turnout. While it is unfortunate I-522 did not pass, it has set the stage for victory in 2016.

As I wrote here, there were other reasons for the setback besides all that money.

More in Local News

Majority of Marysville City Council seats are contested

The most closely watched race is between Mark James and Donna Wright.

500 tires go up in flames at a store south of Everett

There were no injuries. And it was nowhere near as bad as that months-long tire fire in 1984.

Inclusion super important to Monroe High senior

Sarah Reeves worked to make homecoming more representative of the student population.

A pot deal between teens leaves them injured, facing charges

Police found out about the incident when both ended up at the same hospital that night.

Funds up for council vote would aid conservation district

District stands to receive an extra $1 million each year, if the County Council gives its approval.

Herald photos of the week

A weekly collection of The Herald’s best images by staff photographers and… Continue reading

Lake Stevens man injured by 50-foot fall near Leavenworth

The rescuers had to tie in to keep from falling due to the steep rugged terrain.

Mill Creek hires Gina Hortillosa as public works director

Hortillosa will be responsible for creating strategic infrastructure plans to promote economic growth.

Most Read