Inslee begins talks on potential shutdown

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Wednesday, June 12, 2013 3:01pm
  • Local News

UPDATED AT 5 P.M.

Gov. Jay Inslee told agency directors to begin figuring out which programs and services they may have to shut down if a new budget is not in place July 1.

Members of his Cabinet received a two-page memo this afternoon outlining the rules and laws which guide what will be halted and what might be allowed to operate.

By next Monday, agency leaders must identify what services are covered by the state transportation budget, do not require money from a non-appropriated fund and are based on constitutional mandates and federal laws.

After the lists of services are turned in, Inslee’s budget director David Schumacher will distribute a list of activities expected to continue and which will not.

(Pick up original post here:)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and the 26 members of his executive cabinet are scheduled to spend an hour this afternoon discussing what might happen in the event of a partial government shutdown next month.

The meeting is set to begin at 4:30 p.m. after which Inslee’s chief of staff and budget director will meet with reporters.

A shutdown could occur if the Legislature fails to adopt a budget before July 1 when the new fiscal year begins. There’s never been a shutdown before though the state did start a fiscal year without a budget once, in 1951.

And in 2001, the clock was winding down when, as Andrew Garber of the Seattle Times blogged, Gov. Gary Locke had his staff draft an executive order identifying what services the state would continue to provide.

Meanwhile, the second special session began this morning though neither the House nor the Senate had floor sessions.

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