Insurance agent reportedly passed off her own DNA as client’s

MUKILTEO — A former Mukilteo State Farm insurance agent had her license revoked by the state in June after investigators found that she’d committed a number of ethical violations, including submitting her own DNA sample and pretending it was a client’s.

Jaime Sue Joyner, 37, left the insurance business in 2010, and let her license lapse the following year. The license was formally revoked in June as the state Insurance Commissioner’s Office investigation wrapped up.

The office reviews complaints of insurance license violations in light of state laws.

Joyner did not appeal the agency’s findings, spokeswoman Kara Klotz said Monday. Police weren’t involved in the case.

Joyner’s husband, Sean, also was disciplined in 2012 in connection with the allegations, Klotz said. His license remains active, and he has had no further disciplinary action from the state.

Efforts to reach them for comment were unsuccessful.

The investigation was prompted by complaints from the insurance policyholders, Klotz said.

Joyner had completed insurance applications and forged signatures for clients without their knowledge or consent, according to a news release.

In some of those cases, she gave herself oral swab tests for genetic samples and submitted her own sample under the guise that it was a client’s sample.

Such tests are a common practice by insurance companies to take a scientific look at a potential client’s overall health, Klotz said.

Joyner reportedly told the state she had clients’ permission to sign for them, something the clients denied. At least six clients were found to be affected in the investigation.

Clients told the state they were unaware that Joyner had signed five-year, $50,000 life insurance policies for them.

Sean Joyner in 2012 was fined $750 in connection with a forged signature on some of the documents.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com.

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