Introductory statements from a Lynnwood Council incumbent and two challengers

Appointed incumbent Lynnwood City Councilman M. Christopher Boyer faces two challengers in the Aug. 6 primary — James Robert Deal and Michael Moore.

The top two vote-getters in the primary advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

Here are introductory statements from the three candidates:

M. Christopher Boyer

I graduated from Rice University, one of our nation’s finest, and have a master’s degree. I’ve taught at universities and acted as a consultant for a wide range of businesses. In my nearly 30-year career in business management and strategic planning, I’ve helped large and small organizations become financially stable. I lead a multi-million-dollar senior housing project in Lynnwood and serve as Pastor for Good Shepherd Baptist Church. I work alongside our neighbors from all races and income levels, of all different beliefs and convictions. All my work requires fiscally prudent management, strong consensus building skills and fresh thinking.

James Robert Deal

Lynnwood’s water comes from Everett, which adds so-called fluoride, a waste by-product of the fertilizer industry. It contains lead, arsenic, mercury, and cadmium. It leaches large amounts of lead from pipes. It is filth. It is ineffective at reducing tooth decay, harms health, repels salmon, and violates our right not to be medicated without consent. Lynnwood never voted for this. Everett has four pipelines running from Spada Lake and could provide us with unmedicated water, which Lynnwood could and should demand. am a real estate and environmental attorney with 35 years experience and president of www.fluoride-class-action.com. See www.jamesrobertdeal.org.

Michael Moore

As a lifelong resident and a small-business owner, I know how to think outside the box to find solutions. I see the need for the city to have greater fiscal responsibility.

The city must cut its expenses and prioritize needs over wants to help balance the budget. The city must live within its means and not become a burden to citizens.

I would like to see city policies to attract new business of all sizes.

As the city faces a financial shortfall I will fight to support funding for police and fire to ensure our safety and peace of mind.

Evan Smith can be reached at schsmith@frontier.com.

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