Judge: Suspect in Pakistan attack no flight risk

PORTLAND, Ore. — A Portland man arrested on charges of aiding a deadly terror attack in Pakistan can be released pending his trial, a U.S. judge ruled Wednesday.

Reaz Qadir Khan, 48, was arrested at his home Tuesday on charges of providing support to a suicide bomber who participated in the 2009 attack that killed about 30 people and injured another 300.

Khan, a wastewater treatment plant operator for the city of Portland, has pleaded not guilty.

On Wednesday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Ethan Knight said the charge against Khan, which carries the possibility of a life sentence, along with Khan’s connections in Pakistan, make him more likely to flee after being charged.

“There are no conditions that can assure his appearance,” Knight said. “This defendant has significant ties overseas. (Surrendering his passport) does not eliminate his risk of flight.”

But Khan’s attorney, Amy Baggio, said Khan has been a good employee of the city who has gone along with the investigation despite knowing that he could be charged.

“He didn’t run away when he heard this was happening,” Baggio said.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul Papak ruled that conditions could be placed that ensure Khan would not flee. Papak’s decision was affirmed later Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Michael Mossman.

Mossman ruled that Khan could be released Thursday after a follow-up hearing. Mossman said he wanted to ensure that Khan’s assets were frozen and that his computer activity was monitored.

Mossman noted the time between the most recent alleged criminal action — 2009 — and the indictment, and said Khan could have fled.

“He knew it at a time when he had lawyers, he knew it at a time when he had passports, and he knew it at a time when he had cash,” Mossman said, “but he didn’t flee.”

Slender, with a black-and-white beard several inches long, Khan appeared in court in a blue jail uniform looking haggard and tired.

An indictment unsealed Tuesday alleges the naturalized U.S. citizen provided advice and financial help to Ali Jaleel, one of three people who carried out the attack at Pakistan’s intelligence headquarters in Lahore.

Jaleel died in the attack. He took responsibility for the bombing in a video released by al-Qaida and was shown at a training camp, federal officials say.

According to the indictment, Khan conspired with Jaleel and others starting in December 2005.

Jaleel allegedly emailed Khan in 2008 about his plan to travel to Pakistan. Two years earlier, Jaleel had been part of a small group from the Maldives that tried to enter Pakistan for training, but he was detained, returned home and placed under house arrest.

The indictment alleges that Kahn instructed Jaleel on how to avoid detection and offered to help with financial arrangements.

In October 2008, Jaleel wrote that he needed $2,500. According to the indictment, Khan contacted someone in Los Angeles who arranged to have the money waiting for Jaleel in Karachi, Pakistan.

Jaleel wrote to Khan the following month, saying he was about to enter a training camp and did not need all the money. Khan allegedly told Jaleel to keep the money so it could be sent to Jaleel’s two wives in the Maldives.

Shortly after the suicide attack, Khan wired almost $750 from an Oregon store to one of Jaleel’s wives, the indictment states.

Khan has lived in the U.S. since 1988, when he began a master’s degree program in New Jersey. After he graduated in 1991, Khan moved briefly to Dallas and then Fullerton, Calif.

He lived in California from 1991 until 2004 or 2005, when he moved to Vancouver, Wash., and finally settled in Portland in 2006.

More in Local News

Lynnwood robbery leads to lockdown at Edmonds schools

Edmonds police said it was just a precaution as they search around Edmonds-Woodway High School.

1 person shot in Everett thrift store parking lot

Multiple people called 911 after overhearing a loud argument and then multiple gunshots.

Marysville 7-Eleven hit by armed robbers

Officers set up a perimeter and brought in a police dog, but the man couldn’t be found.

2 women struck, injured while crossing busy roads

The first happened Wednesday night in Everett. The second was Thursday morning in Edmonds.

One dead in crash south of Granite Falls

Two cars collided near the intersection of N. Lake Roesiger Road and Hidden Valley Road.

Old Silvana Creamery recalling whole raw milk

The milk was sold at the farm store, directly to customers and at local stores.

Signs show the rates for using the express toll lanes for traffic headed southbound on Interstate 405, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, in Bothell, Wash. Gov. Jay Inslee announced plans Tuesday to try to decrease congestion on I-405 in answer to commuter complaints that the new express lane tolling system is making traffic worse. The governor said he would not be shutting down the tolling system as some people have called for. But the state transportation department is making plans to add new northbound general purpose lanes to ease some of the congestion and also plan to make it easier to move into and out of the express lanes. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
If drivers paid even more, I-405 toll lanes might speed up

A report recommends lifting the maximum toll of $10 and varying it by segment traveled.

Departing mayor’s locally drawn portrait joins city’s pantheon

Artist Elizabeth Person’s portrait of Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson will hang with others at City Hall.

Investigation recommends girl shot by officers face charges

The teen is accused of assaulting her boyfriend and the responding police officers.

Most Read