Little change in latest county ballot count

Little changed in local candidate races and ballot issues after another round of election results was released Wednesday evening by the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office.

The new vote tallies barely budged the relative standing of two candidates vying fill the late Drew Nielsen’s seat on the Everett City Council.

Scott Bader led with 52.3 percent of the 20,698 votes cast, the County Auditor’s Office reported. June Robinson had 47.2 percent of the total, with 1,041 fewer votes than Bader.

“It’s an encouraging sign,” said Bader, who wanted to see more votes come in before concluding who won the race.

Robinson was not immediately available for comment.

In a contentious race in the 1st Legislative District, state Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe, D-Bothell, continued to hold a 10 percent lead over Dawn McCravey, a Bothell Republican.

In the 10th Legislative District, state Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Camano Island, was trailing her challenger, state Rep. Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor, in a race divided by about 6 percent of the vote.

Haugen has served in Olympia for 30 years, first as a representative and then as a senator. She is the chairwoman of the Senate transportation committee.

Haugen’s campaign released a statement Wednesday afternoon.

“We knew this race was going to be close. All of Sen. Haugen’s races have been close,” said campaign manager Alex Bond. “But we remain confident that the voters in the 10th District know how hard she has worked for them and that this will be reflected in the votes yet to be counted. We remain calm and will wait to see what the remainder of the results have to say.”

On Tuesday night, Bailey claimed the victory.

In Mill Creek, about 68 percent of the voters are approving a 0.1 percent sales tax increase that would pay for police and public safety. That’s about the same percentage as Tuesday night.

The ballot measure in Mukilteo that would allow the city to buy park land in Japanese Gulch continued to fall short of the required 60 percent majority needed to impose a property tax increase.

The “yes” vote rose Wednesday to 3,546 or 55.75 percent of the vote.

Proponents of the measure said they plan to continue to pursue grant funding of the land purchase.

Noah Haglund contributed to this report.

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