Lovick vetoes council, reclaims tech department

EVERETT — Snohomish County Executive John Lovick on Friday moved to take control of the county tech department next year, disappointing some other elected leaders.

Lovick vetoed the County Council’s decision to keep the county’s tech department under the county auditor through 2017. That overturned an ordinance the council passed Feb. 12 on a 3-2 vote.

The latest actions followed last year’s leadership crisis at the county, in which the council took the extraordinary step of stripping Lovick’s predecessor, Aaron Reardon, from his role in overseeing the tech department.

“Even though I was willing to honor the effects of the 2013 emergency ordinance, I believe the justification of doing so has expired,” Lovick wrote in a nearly three-page veto letter. “I firmly believe that the Department of Information Services should be reassigned to the office of the executive now, not a year from now.”

The tech department became a political football a year ago, as evidence mounted of abuses of power by Reardon and some of his staff.

Auditor Carolyn Weikel agreed to assume control of the department, which includes a nearly $20 million annual budget and 85 positions.

After Lovick was appointed in June to take over for Reardon, Weikel asked for more time to follow through with reforms in the tech department. Lovick said the department should be restored to the executive’s authority, as intended in the County Charter.

“I’m disappointed because I had a lot of positive initiatives I wanted to work on,” Weikel said Friday.

They include continuing work to mend fences with other county departments, improving the way the county handles public records requests and examining data-storage costs.

Council members who supported extending Weikel’s oversight said they found her arguments more persuasive than Lovick’s.

“The reason I voted for it is that Carolyn had a plan, and never once did the executive talk about what he wanted to do with the department,” Councilman Ken Klein said. “I think major changes need to be made.”

Klein said he believes the county potentially could save millions of dollars by implementing changes such as contracting to store data on the Internet cloud, rather than maintaining its own servers.

“My concern is that they’re not going to see these changes that need to be made,” Klein said. “I have no reason to believe that they’re going to happen under the executive.”

Council Chairman Dave Somers said he was disappointed in the executive’s decision, calling it not in the best interest of the department or the county. Similar to Klein, Somers said that Weikel had articulated a clear vision for managing the department, while Lovick had not.

Council members Stephanie Wright and Brian Sullivan, however, have sided with Lovick, arguing that management of the department fits best under the executive now that the leadership crisis under Reardon has passed.

Under the county charter, the council could override Lovick’s veto, but that would require four votes.

Noah Haglund: 425-339-3465; nhaglund@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Everett district relents on eminent domain moving expenses

Homeowners near Bothell still must be out by April to make way for a planned new high school.

Their grown children died, but state law won’t let them sue

Families are seeking a change in the state’s limiting wrongful-death law.

Officials rule train-pedestrian death an accident

The 37-year-old man was trying to move off the tracks when the train hit him, police say.

Ex-Monroe cop re-arrested after losing sex crime case appeal

He was sentenced to 14 months in prison but was free while trying to get his conviction overturned.

Marysville hit-and-run leaves man with broken bones

The state patrol has asked for help solving an increasing number of hit-and-run cases in the state.

Everett man killed at bar had criminal history, gang ties

A bar employee reportedly shot Matalepuna Malu, 29, whose street name was “June Bug.”

Front Porch

EVENTS Autoharpist in Everett Folksinger, storyteller and autoharp virtuoso Adam Miller returns… Continue reading

Shock from WSU suicide ripples through Snohomish County

Roughly 1 in 10 seniors, sophomores and 8th-graders said they had attempted to take their own lives.

$1,000 reward for info on who killed an eagle near Snohomish

After being shot, the raptor was treated at the Sarvey Wildlife Center but died overnight.

Most Read