Lynnwood: Banner signs need permits

LYNNWOOD — Businesses in Lynnwood now can display banner signs, if they obtain a permit.

Previous city rules did not allow businesses to use banners.

The city defined those as signs made of fabric, canvas or similar materials that can be viewed from across the street. Example signs would be “Now Hiring” or “Coming Soon.”

Banner signs were allowed in other cities, and local businesses wanted to be able to use them, too, said Corbitt Loch, the city’s deputy director of community development.

“The change comes from the needs of local businesses.” he said.

The new rules went into effect in late April, after a City Council review

About a half-dozen permits have been requested and approved so far, Loch said.

The changed rules are meant to be a more balanced, flexible approach to how businesses can advertise, according to a city news release.

The banner signs are allowed with a permit for grand openings, construction or renovation projects, and special events such as holiday sales.

The permits cost $36 until June 1, after which the price goes up to $38.

The signs only may be hung on buildings, not light poles or cars, and the maximum size varies by building size.

Inflatable signs and balloons still are not allowed for business advertisements.

For more info, contact 425-670-5400 or www.ci.lynnwood.wa.us.

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