Marysville looking to tidy up neighborhoods with Clean Sweep

MARYSVILLE — The city is looking for more volunteers to participate later this month in the second annual Clean Sweep Week, which aims to make the city safer, more attractive and more livable.

The city will conduct neighborhood-wide cleanups during April 20-27. Public works and parks crews, with help from Waste Management Northwest, will work with property owners to dispose of debris, free of charge.

Last year’s efforts focused successfully on the downtown corridor, said Gloria Hirashima, the city’s chief administrative officer. This year, the city plans to focus on the downtown area between Ash and Cedar avenues from Fourth to 80th streets, Kellogg Meadows near Grove Elementary and the Timberbrook neighborhood in north-central Marysville.

In these areas, large materials, unsightly junk, tires and non-hazardous items must be placed as close as possible to the roadside or in front of homes for pickup. Refrigerators and other appliances containing freon or other hazardous materials are excluded.

Additionally, volunteers will team up with city crews to spruce up streets, paint over graffiti, plant trees for Arbor Day, pressure-wash sidewalks, do general cleanup of main streets and much more.

The City Council this year budgeted $60,000 for the cleanup.

To participate in city-sponsored activities or suggest project ideas, contact parks maintenance manager Mike Robinson at 360-363-8406 or email mrobinson@marysvillewa.gov.

Here are some of the events and volunteer opportunities:

Community Shred-A-Thon: 9 a.m. to noon (or until trucks full) April 20, City Hall parking lot, 1049 State Ave. People can get their personal documents shredded at the free event. Six-box limit. Participants must remain until your documents are destroyed. Info: 360-363-8086.

Suggested donation: Bring a canned or non-perishable food item or cash to donate to support the Marysville Community Food Bank.

People can also bring bring old computers and other digital devices to donate to Marysville Arts and Tech High School’s LAN Club. Students wipe the data from hard drives, then restore the items for fundraisers and donations to Third World schools. Donations limited to: computer towers, laptops, tablets, e-readers, keyboards, mice, flat monitors (no bulky CRT monitors,) digital cameras and video recorders and system install disks.

Earth Day Celebration: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 20, Qwuloolt Estuary Restoration Project Site, Harborview Park, 4700 60th Ave. NE, Marysville.

People are invited to help plant native trees and shrubs at the Qwuloolt Estuary Restoration Project site and spread mulch to nourish new plants and suppress weeds. Come prepared for all weather conditions. The first 200 participants will receive Earth Day 2013 T-shirts. Plants, tools, gloves, water and snacks will be provided. To register, contact Erin Martin at 425-388-3464, ext. 4661 or Erin.Martin@snoco.org.

Graffiti Paint Outs: Volunteers and volunteer groups can register to get involved in painting over graffiti around town. Contact parks maintenance manager Mike Robinson for more details at 360-363-8406, or email mrobinson@marysvillewa.gov. Locations at “hot spots” around Marysville and street-side fences where homeowners have been victimized will be assigned, and litter pickup will also be encouraged. Paint and materials will be provided. Be sure to wear old clothes that you won’t mind getting messy.

Adopt-a-Street Cleanups: Groups already sponsoring Adopt-a-Street stretches of road for litter control will pick up their assigned areas. For more information about starting your own Adopt-a-Street, contact Marysville Public Works at 360-363-8100.

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