Mukilteo family misses big prize on ‘Family Feud’

MUKILTEO — Well, the Seungs didn’t come out on top in their “Family Feud.”

The Mukilteo family was edged out by the O’Neal family of Kentucky in their appearance on the nationally syndicated game show, which was recorded in May and aired Monday.

“That’s how it goes,” said Shirley Seung, 63, one of the five members of her family who appeared on the show.

Seung and her husband, Christopher, also 63; daughters Reyna, 35, and Crystal, 32, and son Brian, 30, made it onto the show after an audition at the Puyallup Mall last winter.

The families have to sign a form promising not to reveal the outcome before the show airs.

In the show, family members are asked to match answers to questions asked in surveys. The first family to 300 points wins a chance at $20,000 and gets to play on the next show, for up to five shows. They also can win a car by winning all five shows.

The other family goes home empty-handed but gets a free trip out of the deal, Shirley Seung said. “Family Feud” pays all the expenses for the families to travel to the taping in Atlanta, including hotel, airfare and transportation.

When host Steve Harvey introduced the Seungs, he raised the mispronunciation of “Mukilteo” to a new level, giving up after two tries and mumbling several more attempts in jest.

The Seungs were playing against four-time defending champions. The O’Neals were playing in their fifth straight show and edged out the Seungs, 302 to 278.

Seung said her family practiced for the show.

“We were ready,” she said. “We were going to get that $20,000.”

Shirley Seung also was on the show with her father and sisters in its first incarnation in 1977. She didn’t win then, either, but family members had to pay their own way to the show and won some parting gifts.

Shirley might not be done with “Family Feud” just yet. She said the Seungs were invited to give it another try after three years.

“Time goes fast,” she said, laughing.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Bicycle tour raises money for dialysis patients

Volunteers also shared health information and put together care packages for homeless women.

Elderly couple escape serious injuries in crash with train

The driver drove down tracks instead of a road, hitting a slow-moving train near Stanwood.

Boeing reaches out to schools

Company employees helped Everett students at recent reading and Manufacturing Day events.

5-vehicle collision sends school bus into ditch; no injuries

No students were hurt when a school bus crashed into… Continue reading

Fire crew returns early from wildfires in Northern California

Four Everett firefighters returned from battling California wildfires late Thursday… Continue reading

Theft lands former insurance salesman 50 days in jail

A former insurance salesman is expected to report to jail… Continue reading

Pair of intrepid musicians climb N. Cascades summits to play

Rose Freeman and Anastasia Allison pack their instruments up mountains for high-altitude recitals.

Everett mayoral campaign is one of the priciest ever

Many campaign donors are giving to both Cassie Franklin and Judy Tuohy.

Herald columnist Julie Muhlstein (left) and Elizabeth Reed, of Snohomish, share something humorous during an interview at Reed’s Snohomish High School Class of 1942 reunion in September 2016. Muhlstein is marking 20 years as a columnist, with about 3,000 of them published in The Herald. Counting her early days as a reporter and editor, she has been with The Herald for 36 years. (Dan Bates / Herald file)
3,000 stories in 20 years: Here are some of my favorites

As a Daily Herald columnist, I’ve met remarkable people and learned much since 1997.

Most Read