Nation’s top teacher among Inslee choices for education council

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 10:11am
  • Local News

Gov. Jay Inslee completed his makeover of the Washington Student Achievement Council on Monday by naming four appointees to replace the quartet he kicked off the panel last month.

Inslee’s nominees are Jeff Charbonneau, a Zillah High School teacher recently chosen as National Teacher of the Year; Maud Daudon, president and chief executive officer of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce; Karen Lee, chief executive officer of Pioneer Human Services and former head of the state Employment Security Department; and Dr. Susana Reyes, assistant superintendent in the Pullman School District.

Their appointments take effect today.

“With this new council we have a great opportunity to rethink how we work with the business community to help students access the training and education they need to be successful and attain the knowledge and skills that our employers demand,” Inslee said in a statement.

They replace four people appointed to the board by former Gov. Chris Gregoire but let go by Inslee last month.

The quartet were Brian Baird, a former congressman now living in Edmonds, Constance Rice, a former Seattle Community College District Board Chairwoman; José Gaitán, former members of the state Academic Achievement and Accountability Commission; and Jay Reich, deputy chief of staff to Gary Locke when Locke was U.S. Secretary of Commerce secretary for President Barack Obama.

The council, established as a cabinet-level agency last year, researches and develops state policies to foment higher levels of educational attainment for students.

It is made up of nine members including five residents, one of whom is a current student, and a representative from four-year universities, community and technical colleges, elementary and secondary schools, and independent colleges.

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