Obama begins short Asian tour on Sunday

Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is headed abroad this weekend for a quick trip through three of Southeast Asian countries that is intended to highlight what the administration views as seeds of foreign policy successes.

In a three-day tour that starts Sunday with stops in Thailand, Myanmar and Cambodia, Obama will promote democratic reforms, opening markets and human rights advances in the region as affirmation for his dual goals of shifting focus from the Middle East to the Asian Pacific and increasing diplomatic engagement with formerly isolated nations.

The latter effort yielded few breakthroughs during Obama’s first term, perhaps with the notable exception of Myanmar, the once-secretive nation emerging from decades of authoritarian rule. Although some of the economic and diplomatic pressure that spurred the shift predates Obama’s presidency, the administration has been eager to portray Myanmar as a victory, though still incomplete, for its diplomacy and as a model for countries that may seek to return to U.S. favor.

Previewing the visit, the first by a U.S. president, National Security Adviser Thomas E. Donilon said Obama’s goal was to “lock in the progress” that has been made by encouraging the government to continue on its path and by cheering on opposition and human rights leaders pushing for more. He said North Korean leaders in Pyongyang ought to be watching the new relationship with interest.

“That is a path that, if North Korea would address the nuclear issue, would be available to them,” Donilon said Thursday in remarks at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “We have said that from the outset. It’s an important example for them to contemplate.”

Donilon conceded that he saw no evidence of North Korean leaders moving in that direction. North Korea is among a few places where the Obama administration has come up short in its strategy of reviving diplomatic channels that had been previously cut off.

Critics argue that Obama’s visit to Myanmar may be premature, pointing to the hundreds of political prisoners, the fragile ceasefires that have halted ethnic conflict in the many areas, and the recent clashes between military leaders and Rohingya Muslims, a minority group seeking recognition and citizenship rights.

“If President Obama doesn’t put his full weight behind further urgent reforms in Myanmar, this trip risks being an ill-timed presidential pat on the back for a regime that has looked the other way as violence rages, destroying villages and communities just in the last few weeks,” said Suzanne Nossel, executive director of Amnesty International USA.

Obama’s aides said the president is mindful that the nation is still in transition. He will meet with President Thein Sein and opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who spent most of 20 years under house arrest resisting the military-controlled regime. Obama will visit with Suu Kyi at the home where she was imprisoned. He’ll also meet privately with activists and other leaders at Yangon University, where he is slated to deliver a speech outlining his vision for burgeoning democracies like Myanmar.

“This is the not a victory celebration, this is barn-raising,” said Danny Russel, senior director for Asia with the White House National Security Council. “This is a moment when we believe that the Burmese leaders have put their feet on the right path and that it’s critical to us that we not miss the moment to influence them, to keep them going.”

Obama will travel first to Bangkok to meet with Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and King Bhumibol Adulyadej, before heading to Myanmar. From Yangon, formerly known as Rangoon, Obama is slated to attend meetings of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations and the East Asia Summit, which are convening in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

—-

&Copy;2012 Tribune Co.

Visit Tribune Co. at www.latimes.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

More in Local News

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

They chose the longshot candidate to fill a vacant seat

Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick will serve as representative for the 39th legislative district.

Definitely not Christmas in July for parched young trees

“I live in Washington. I should not have to water a Christmas tree,” says one grower. But they did.

Marysville babysitter faces jail time in infant’s death

Medical experts differed over whether it was head trauma or illness that caused the baby to die.

Whether cheers or jeers, DeVos appearance will rouse spirits

Trump’s secretary of education is coming to Bellevue to raise money for a pro-business think tank.

Superior Court judge admits DUI on freeway

Prosecutors recommend a “standard” penalty for Marybeth Dingledy, who “is terribly sorry.”

Self-defense or murder? Trial begins in shooting death

Explanations as to why a man was shot in the back on a Bothell cul-de-sac are starkly different.

Front Porch

EVENTS Chicken dinner time Seniors serve up a family-style chicken dinner from… Continue reading

Detectives seek suspect in woman’s homicide

Alisha Michelle Canales-McGuire was shot to death Wednesday at a home south of Paine Field.

Most Read