Organizers cancel Redneck Games (video)

EAST DUBLIN, Ga. — Organizers of the Redneck Games, a Georgia festival that includes competitions such as toilet seat horseshoes and mud pit belly flops, say this summer’s event is being canceled.

The local Lions Club voted not to hold this year’s event because of the economy, lower attendance and sponsors backing out, East Dublin City Administrator Larry Drew said.

“It’s been good for us but the last few years it’s been going down,” Drew, who is also the Lions Club treasurer, told the Courier Herald of Dublin. “We decided to take a break and see what happens next year.”

The Redneck Games, which began in 1996 as a response to Atlanta hosting the Summer Olympics, has drawn visitors from as far away as Europe, Asia and Australia.

The site of the games, Buckeye Park, is under scrutiny from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Agency officials said the nearby creek and the Oconee River could be contaminated by bacteria draining from a restroom installed at the park, the Telegraph of Macon reported.

The city signed a consent order with the agency last month, agreeing to conduct regular fecal coliform testing in the area and to pay a $10,000 fine for a series of environmental violations related to management of the park over the last five years.

Drew said the decision to cancel the Redneck Games after 17 years was unrelated to any contamination concerns.

City officials also dispute the state agency’s interpretation of the situation.

“We responded to everything (EPD) ever gave us, but we didn’t agree with what they wanted us to do,” Drew said.

City officials think the high bacteria levels were caused by some kind of animal rather than the restroom, Drew told the Telegraph. He said the restroom isn’t heavily used and isn’t open during the Redneck Games, when portable toilets are used instead.

The event was a fund-raiser for the local Lions Club. Club members will revisit hosting the games in 2014 if organizers get enough responses, Drew said.

“If we get a lot of calls, we’ll probably start it back next year,” he said. “It’s just according to if people are interested.”

More in Local News

A customer walks away after buying a hot dog from a vendor on 33rd St and Smith Street near the Everett Station on Friday. The Everett Station District Alliance pictures the area east of Broadway and south of Hewitt Avenue as a future neighborhood and transit hub that could absorb expected population growth. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
How can Everett Station become a vibrant part of city?

A neighborhood alliance focused on long-term revitalization will update the public Tuesday.

Man arrested after police find van full of drugs, cash and guns

An officer on patrol noticed a vehicle by itself in the middle of a WinCo parking lot at 2 a.m.

After work to address issues, Lynnwood gets clean audit

The city has benefited from increased revenues from sales tax.

Bolshevik replaces BS in Eyman’s voters pamphlet statement

The initiative promoter also lost a bid to include a hyperlink to online coverage of the battle.

Man with shotgun confronts man on toilet about missing phone

Police say the victim was doing his business when the suspect barged in and threatened him.

Detectives seek suspect in woman’s homicide

Alisha Michelle Canales-McGuire was shot to death Wednesday at a home south of Paine Field.

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

Smith Island habitat restoration cost to rise $1.2 million

The project is intended to increase survival rates for juvenile chinook salmon.

Jim Mathis, the Vietnam veteran whose Marysville garden was recently featured in The Herald, died Wednesday. Mathis, who suffered from PTSD and cancer, found solace in his beautiful garden. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Vietnam veteran Jim Mathis found peace in his garden

The Marysville man who served two tours died Wednesday after suffering from cancer and PTSD.

Most Read