Pencil sculpture adds character to Everett corner

EVERETT – Four giant pencils dangled in the chilly air above Hoyt Avenue and California Street. Weighing 505 pounds, the green, red, yellow and turquoise pencils arrived without their erasers.

Heidi Heimarck was walking her dog past on Tuesday morning and stopped to see what was going on.

“I really love it!” she said. “What I like about it is that it encourages readers and artists. This is an inspiration piece.”

That’s the kind of response downtown developer Craig Skotdal was hoping to hear.

The new sculpture fits in with the Library Place development and its big books sculpture outside the Everett Library, made by the same artist, Mukilteo’s Dillon Works.

“We wanted to do another (sculpture), to extend library place” said Craig Skotdal, president of Skotdal Real Estate. He wanted vibrant colors to make the street more unique.

The idea came from Skotdal’s father, Art Skotdal, while he was traveling with his wife Marianne in California.

“We saw something that looked similar,” Art Skotdal said. “We wanted to do something people would like, and we do like this.”

The 10-foot-tall sculpture was standing in its new home outside the Elks Lodge after about a half hour of work. That included attaching the erasers.

Craig Skotdal said he approached Dillon Works with the concept and wanted it to be life-like. Around 12 employees worked on it for about six to eight weeks, starting on Sept. 15, a week after the city’s approval.

“The sculpture has been made by sheets of steel folded onto shapes, with automotive paint and clear coat on top” said Daniel Lorentz, of Dillon Works.

Dillon Works president Mike Dillon added that the sculpture is made with stainless steel to avoid rust over the years. They also came up with a fake brand name for the pencils, because using a known brand would have caused a problem with trademarks. The “Cal Hoyt Pencil Co.” pencil are numbered “2802” in tribute to the sculpture location.

Craig Skotdal said the sculpture supports the art transformation of Hoyt Avenue, and gives families another reason to come downtown with their children.

“Parents have a lot of fun taking pictures with their kids in front of public art,” he said.

He wanted the sculpture to be in place before Thanksgiving, to give people the opportunity to enjoy it for the holiday weekend. On Saturday downtown businesses are offering discounts for the Holiday Stroll, and the new sculpture will be an added attraction.

“This is something for the community to make it more special,” he said.

More in Local News

Car crashes near Everett after State Patrol pursuit

The driver and a second person in the car suffered injuries.

They chose the longshot candidate to fill a vacant seat

Sultan Mayor Carolyn Eslick will serve as representative for the 39th legislative district.

Definitely not Christmas in July for parched young trees

“I live in Washington. I should not have to water a Christmas tree,” says one grower. But they did.

Marysville babysitter faces jail time in infant’s death

Medical experts differed over whether it was head trauma or illness that caused the baby to die.

Whether cheers or jeers, DeVos appearance will rouse spirits

Trump’s secretary of education is coming to Bellevue to raise money for a pro-business think tank.

Superior Court judge admits DUI on freeway

Prosecutors recommend a “standard” penalty for Marybeth Dingledy, who “is terribly sorry.”

Self-defense or murder? Trial begins in shooting death

Explanations as to why a man was shot in the back on a Bothell cul-de-sac are starkly different.

Golfers help Pink the Rink

The fundraiser to aid breast cancer research culminates with a Nov. 4 Silvertips game.

A customer walks away after buying a hot dog from a vendor on 33rd St and Smith Street near the Everett Station on Friday. The Everett Station District Alliance pictures the area east of Broadway and south of Hewitt Avenue as a future neighborhood and transit hub that could absorb expected population growth. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Alliance plans meeting to discuss future of the Everett Station

Key themes are economic development, parking, green space, safety, and transportation connections

Most Read