Reed College investigates fall ritual

PORTLAND, Ore. — Reed College in Portland is investigating a complaint that a fall tradition that this year included some naked students creates a hostile learning environment for sexual assault victims.

The Oregonian reported that the ritual precedes the first lecture in the Humanities 110 class required of freshman.

Juniors and seniors gather to demand freshmen offer up “libations” for the “gods.” Freshmen pour some coffee or beverage on the ground in hopes of academic success.

This year, some juniors and seniors were naked. They yelled and gesticulated as the freshmen entered the building.

Reed President John Kroger said in an email a complaint alleged that making people once victims of sexual assault go through such a gauntlet violates federal law prohibiting discrimination based on sex in educational programs that get federal funding.

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