Reform group gives lawmakers D+ on school funding

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Tuesday, March 26, 2013 10:41am
  • Local News

When it comes to improving the achievement of students in public schools, Washington lawmakers aren’t making the grade.

And when it comes to funding the system they are nearly flunking.

That’s according to a report card issued today by the League of Education Voters, a Seattle-based group which is pushing for school funding and classroom reforms.

LEV graded lawmakers on how well they did in five areas compared to their performance in those same areas two years ago.

They earned their highest grade, C, in the area of early learning programs. They earned their worst, D+, in funding.

“In many measures of funding – including public effort and per pupil spending—Washington ranked well below other states and the national average, meaning Washington’s students have less support than their peers across the nation,” according to a LEV press release.

Here is a summary of the findings in the report card:

-54 percent (24,412) of low-income children eligible for existing preschool programs are not being served.

-More than half (51 percent) of all recent high school graduates had to enroll in remedial math courses at community and technical colleges in 2009-10.

-Washington is ranked 37th in the nation for on-time graduation rates, and large gaps in graduation rates between white and Asian students and African American, Latino, Native American, and Pacific Islander students persist.

-At the same time post-secondary education becomes increasingly important, costs for higher education are rising. The number of student loans taken out by Washington residents increased by 50 percent from the 2011 Citizens’ Report Card.

-Washington ranked 49th in public effort for school funding relative to individual income, spending only $35.07 per $1,000 of personal income on education. The national average is $43.43.

More in Local News

Fatal car crash reported on Highway 92 near Lake Stevens

The 3 p.m. accident and investigation stopped traffic in both directions near Machias Road.

Mayor tries new tactic to curb fire department overtime

Stephanson says an engine won’t go into service when the only available staff would be on overtime.

Cheering families welcome Kidd, Shoup after 6 months at sea

“I get back Daddy back today,” said one homemade sign at Naval Station Everett.

Paine Field fire chief will be allowed to retire

In his letter, the airport director noted Jeff Bohnet was leaving while under investigation.

Stanwood man, 33, killed in crash near Marysville

Speed may have been a factor, the sheriff’s department said.

County plans to sue to recoup costs from ballot drop-box law

A quarter-million dollars could be spent adding 19 ballot boxes in rural areas.

Firefighters come to the rescue and give mom new stroller

Donations to the Good Neighbor Program covered the $143.20 cost.

County frees up $1.6M for Everett’s low-barrier housing

The plan appears on track for the City Council to transfer land ahead of next month’s groundbreaking.

Jamie Copeland is a senior at Cedar Park Christian Schools’ Mountlake Terrace campus. She is a basketball player, ASB president, cheerleader and, of course, a Lion. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Cedar Park Christian senior stepping up to new challenges

Jamie Copeland’s academics include STEM studies, leadership, ASB activities, honor society.

Most Read