Seattle student pepper-sprayed, tackled gunman

SEATTLE — The man blasting away with a shotgun paused to reload, and Jon Meis saw his chance.

The 22-year-old building monitor pepper-sprayed and tackled the gunman Thursday in Seattle Pacific University’s Otto Miller Hall, likely preventing further carnage, according to police and university officials.

Meis and other students subdued him until officers arrived and handcuffed him moments later.

Police said the shooter, who killed a 19-year-old man and wounded two other young people, had 50 additional shotgun shells and a hunting knife. He admitted after his arrest that he wanted to kill as many people as possible before taking his own life, Seattle police wrote in a statement filed in court Friday.

“I’m proud of the selfless actions that my roommate, Jon Meis, showed today taking down the shooter,” fellow student Matt Garcia wrote on Twitter. “He is a hero.”

The suspect, 26-year-old Aaron Rey Ybarra of Mountlake Terrace, has a long history of mental health problems for which he had been treated and medicated, said his attorney, public defender Ramona Brandes. Ybarra is on suicide watch at the jail, she said.

“He is cognizant of the suffering of the victims and their families and the entire Seattle Pacific community,” she said. “He is sorry.”

Meis, a dean’s list electrical engineering student, was emotionally anguished but not injured in the shooting, Harborview Medical Center spokeswoman Susan Gregg said Friday. He was treated there and released.

Roman Kukhotskiy, 22, who was in the building when the violence broke out, said: “I was amazed that he was willing to risk all that for us. If Jon didn’t stop him, what’s to say? I could have been the next victim.”

He said Meis is getting married this summer and has accepted a job with Boeing, where he has interned in previous years.

The leafy campus of the private, Christian university about 10 minutes north of downtown Seattle was quiet the morning after the shooting, with a service held at midday. People stopped by a makeshift memorial near Otto Miller Hall to pay their respects.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray identified the student killed as Paul Lee, a “Korean-American student with a bright future.”

The gunman had just entered the science and engineering building when he opened fire in the foyer. Classes were taking place upstairs.

Ybarra was booked into the King County Jail and appeared, wearing a protective vest, in a jailhouse courtroom Friday. A judge found probable cause to detain him without bail.

“We are so very shocked and sad over yesterday’s shootings at SPU,” Ybarra’s family said in a statement. “We are crushed at the amount of pain caused to so many people. To the victims and their families, our prayers are with you.”

Ybarra is not a student at the school, police said.

The victims included critically wounded Sarah Williams, 19, who was in serious condition Friday after a five-hour surgery, as well as 24-year-old Thomas Fowler, who was released from the hospital, Gregg said.

Meis, who graduated from Seattle Christian Schools in SeaTac, kept a low profile the day after the shooting. An outgoing voice message at a phone listing for his parents’ home in Renton said: “We ask that you please respect our privacy during this time while we recover.” It solicited prayers for students and the family of the man killed.

Salomon Meza Tapia, a friend who serves with Meis on the board of a student engineers group, described him as a hardworking student who is “always super chill.”

“I am not surprised he was cool and collected enough to take action,” he wrote in an email to the Associated Press. “I was in the building, and I can say he definitely saved our lives. I am thankful to be alive and thank God for Jon Meis’ courage and actions.”

“There are a number of heroes in this,” Assistant Police Chief Paul McDonagh said Thursday. “The people around (the gunman) stepped up.”

He added: “But for the great response by the people of Seattle Pacific, this incident might have been much more tragic.”

McDonagh said detectives are working to determine the gunman’s motive or intended target.

Associated Press writers Rachel La Corte in Olympia and Manuel Valdes and Donna Gordon Blankinship in Seattle contributed to this report, along with AP news researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York.

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