Secretary of State revises cost of tax advisory votes

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Tuesday, August 6, 2013 11:12am
  • Local News

Providing voters with information on five tax advisory votes this fall is going to cost $120,000, which is about half as much as the Secretary of State originally predicted.

Voters, as a result of a 2007 initiative penned by Mukilteo’s Tim Eyman, will voice their opinion the five laws which will bring in money for state coffers by eliminating tax breaks or revising tax rules.

In July, state election officials estimated it would take up 20 pages in the voters’ guide to list each tax increase, what it produces in revenue and how the 147 lawmakers voted on each measure.

At that time they projected the tab for producing those pages would be $240,000 based on what the state paid for materials concerning two advisory measures that were on the ballot in 2012.

But state officials have decided on a different design. They will be consolidating all the information on how lawmakers voted into one chart. Initially, the state planned to provide a separate vote chart for each measure which would have eaten up a lot of pages in the guide.

“We are happy (Tim Eyman) didn’t raise objections to our format,” David Ammons, spokesman for Secretary of State Kim Wyman, said today. “It saves some taxpayers dollars and still gets out the relevant information.”

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