Snohomish girl’s friends seeking donations for funeral expenses

SNOHOMISH — Friends of a teen who died Thursday at Seattle Children’s Hospital are asking for help to pay for her funeral expenses.

Anais Garcia, 14, was a freshman at Snohomish High School. She was diagnosed with hydrocephalus,* said Silvia Bauman, who works as a translator for the Snohomish School District and who is speaking for the family. Hydrocephalus is an excessive accumulation of fluid in the brain.

The funeral for Anais Garcia is scheduled for 11 a.m. Friday at St. Michael Catholic Church, 1512 Pine Ave. in Snohomish.

Bauman estimates that the funeral and plot at Snohomish’s Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery will cost about $8,000.

Bauman said that Garcia complained of a headache on June 7 and went to bed. When her parents checked on her later, she was unresponsive and was taken first to Providence Regional Medical Center Everett and then transferred to Seattle Children’s Hospital. By the time she arrived at Children’s, “she was pretty much in a coma,” Bauman said.

Bauman, who also is on the board of directors of Christmas House in Everett, began organizing financial help for the family. She said they have had ongoing major medical expenses due to their daughter’s hydrocephalus. In addition, her father, Enrique Garcia, was injured at his job and is not able to work, she said.

Anais Garcia previously attended Cascade View Elementary School and Valley View Middle School in Snohomish.

She was born in Kirkland in 1999 and had several surgeries for medical problems caused by the disease, Bauman said.

“She was a happy girl,” Bauman said. “She enjoyed shopping. She liked to wear certain clothes and have her hair fixed and be a typical teenager.”

Donations may be made to the Garcia Funeral Fund at any Washington Federal Bank.

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

Correction, June 18, 2014: An earlier version of this story incorrectly named the disease associated with Anais’ death. It was caused by hydrocephalus, excessive accumulation of fluid in the brain.

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