Snohomish man named to White House advisory position

SNOHOMISH — A Snohomish man is serving on a federal advisory committee for the White House.

Stephen Zirschky was appointed to an industry trade advisory committee for high-tech products.

Zirschky, an attorney for the Seattle Internet security corporation, WatchGuard Technologies, started his service last summer. He had to wait to announce his appointment until after his secret security clearance. He’ll serve on the committee for Information and Communications Technologies, Services and Electronic Commerce.

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce and the U.S. Trade Representative last year appointed him to the 18-member committee known as ITAC 8. The committees represent 16 different trade industries such as aerospace, consumer goods and small business.

“It’s to get that citizen input,” Zirschky said. “It’s a real privilege for me to be involved with that.”

The committees were established ensure industry is involved in developing U.S. trade policy. Advisors who are associated with various U.S. companies help shape U.S. trade policy. They offer technical advice, sometimes directly to the president.

“There is somebody out there watching out for our good interests,” Zirschky said.

He expects to head back to Washington, D.C., to work on upcoming recommendations this week.

Zirschky has long been involved in public service.

In 2006, the Republic of Latvia appointed him to serve as consular officer in Washington state.

“I fell in love with Latvia and their particular legal requirements,” Zirschky said.

As a consular officer, he promotes business between Latvia and the state. He recently hosted the president of Latvia’s visit to the U.S.

Zirschky said he will continue serving in his role for Latvia in addition his White House responsibilities. He said he finds the time to serve because sharing real-world perspective with people who work in Washington, D.C., is critical to establishing policy.

“I’ve been involved in civic affairs for many, many years,” he said. “Civic involvement runs in the DNA.”

Amy Nile: 425-339-3192; anile@heraldnet.com.

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