State asks public for ideas on ending abuse of disabled parking placards

  • By Jerry Cornfield
  • Tuesday, August 6, 2013 5:27pm
  • Local News

A special panel studying ways to prevent abuse of disabled parking placards by able-bodied drivers wants to get input from the public.

A work group began meeting in June to figure out where potential abuse may be taking place and develop measures to reduce fraudulent use and issuance of placards and license plates.

Today the Department of Licensing invited the public to email ideas to the work group at DPWorkgroup@dol.wa.gov.

The deadline for public comments is October 15, 2013.

Lawmakers created the work group to provide recommendations on how to improve the processes used for issuing placards and plates without impeding individuals who need them.

It may consider actions ranging from closer monitoring of physicians, who determine whether a driver needs a placard, to creating a system for cops and the public to know whether what they see hanging from a car’s rearview mirror is valid. The recommendations are due Dec. 1.

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