State building trails for varied uses in Reiter hills

GOLD BAR — People who like off-road vehicles likely will get a test run later this summer of what riding at Reiter Foothills could be.

The state Department of Natural Resources is planning to open about two miles of trails for motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle riders in August. The exact days are still up in the air.

“There are a lot of variables,” said Ben Cleveland, regional manager for the Northwest Region.

Natural Resources staff this month began developing 35 miles of trails on the 2,000 acres between Index and Gold Bar. Half of the property will be developed for use by four-wheelers and dirt bikes. The rest will be set aside for hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders.

Crews have removed trees, excavated and widened trails for motor use. Work also been completed on a temporary parking lot and widening Deer Flats Road.

The state agency has completed a quarter-mile of trail and expects to completing another 1.4-mile loop by July.

The state expects to spend about $3.6 million at Reiter Foothills.

On Tuesday, Peter Goldmark, state commissioner of public lands, was given a tour of the work.

The project at Reiter Foothills is unique in all Washington State, he said.

“It’s better to build it right and make it sustainable,” Goldmark said.

Alejandro Dominguez: 425-339-3422; adominguez@ heraldnet.com.

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