Sultan teen battling disease gets VIP tour of Cabela’s

TULALIP — Christopher Butler knew his grandmother was taking him to Cabela’s on Friday, but he had no idea that 20 employees would cheer him when he entered the store.

Christopher, 15, of Sultan, has juvenile Huntington’s disease, a terminal condition that affects a person’s ability to think, talk and move.

He had been talking about wanting to go elk hunting, which his grandmother and guardian, Karen Falk, mentioned to a few people at her church.

One thing led to another and soon, the Tulalip Cabela’s and other organizations had it all planned out, including a tour of the store with quick tutorials from staff members on pitching a tent, casting a fishing line, tying a fly, bow hunting, calling elk and firearm basics.

A hunt is planned for this fall in Oregon.

Christopher was asked how he felt when he walked through the door to cheers and high-fives from the staff.

“Excited,” he said.

Bob Simpson, who belongs to Falk’s church, also is a member of the Seattle branch of Safari Club International, a hunting organization. Simpson approached Cabela’s and set up the store tour. Arrangements were made with Eden Ridge Outfitters of Myrtle Point, Ore., to take Christopher on the trip.

Safari Club International is footing the entire bill for the trip, estimated at about $2,000, group member Wade Winder said.

In-kind contributions include donations of clothing and equipment from Cabela’s and the services of the taxidermist who mounts the animals at the Cabela’s store in Lacey. Altogether the trip will be worth about $4,000, Winder said.

Christopher will be closely supervised on the outing, but when the group encounters an elk, he’ll be the one to bring it down.

“He’s going to do the trigger pulling,” Simpson said.

Falk expressed joy and gratitude for all that is being done for her grandson.

“This is amazing,” she said during Friday’s tour.

Huntington’s disease causes degeneration of nerve cells in the brain, affecting a person’s functional abilities and usually results in movement, cognitive and psychiatric disorders, according to the Mayo Clinic website.

Christopher’s brother, Lucas, died from the disease earlier this year, Falk said. He was 21.

The inherited condition most often strikes adults in their 40s or 50s, according to the Mayo Clinic, but also can strike children.

When it does, the disease progresses faster. It’s usually fatal within 15 years of the onset of symptoms, according to Falk — or, in Lucas’ case, five.

Christopher’s symptoms began appearing about two years ago, Falk said.

“We’re still praying for a cure,” she said.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

Learn more

For more information on Huntington’s Disease go to tinyurl.com/HuntingtonsHDYO or tinyurl.com/HuntingtonsMayo.

More in Local News

Waiting lists and growing demand for low-income preschools

There will be 1,000 more spots opening in the state next school year — far fewer than needed.

Snohomish County PUD general manager and CEO to retire

Craig Collar, 54, who will return to Montana, joined the utility as a senior manager in 2006.

Jensen Webster sorts through food stuffs at the Sultan High School in Sultan on March 14, 2018. (Kevin Clark / The Daily Herald)
Sultan school children take charge to help their peers

The Sky Valley Youth Coalition has installed pantries at schools so kids can take food home.

Cougs beat Dawgs — and the Hawks

WSU boasts the No. 1 specialty license plate, and the money that comes with it.

Police seek female suspect in north Everett burglaries

She’s suspected of being an accomplice to a man who has committed five other burglaries.

North Machias Road bridge down to one lane until fixes made

A bridge south of Lake Stevens remains at one lane of travel… Continue reading

Everett woman found dead identified as 21-year-old

There were no obvious signs of trauma on the body of Brianna Leigh Nyer.

Ivar’s in Mukilteo closes for disinfection after illnesses

The Snohomish Health District said it’s not certain what caused some patrons to get sick.

People fill up various water jug and containers at the artesian well on 164th Street on Monday, April 2, 2018 in Lynnwood, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
It’s the water: Lynnwood’s artesian well draws fans from miles around

True believers have been flocking for decades to the last well flowing in the Alderwood district.

Most Read