‘The 206’ will live on, but not until April

Prepare for a dry spell.

“The 206” won’t be on TV for the next two months.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is that the show will go on because enough viewers tuned in after “Saturday Night Live” in January to watch pilot episodes of the regional sketch comedy.

“It’s like a corny success story,” co-creator Chris Cashman said.

“It was based on the fans. This was the idea. We got it off the ground and they got excited and watched it. The ratings were fantastic. We realized we could and should continue.”

It’s a revival for his dad, Pat Cashman, and funny accomplice John Keister, who did the popular show “Almost Live!” until 1999.

Using the same skit format, “The 206” had spoofs such as “Renton Abbey” and “Weed and Marriage.”

“There was a lot of material we didn’t use,” Chris Cashman said.

He said the cast is in production mode of new episodes. “It’s a giant chess match. We have to do a lot of content. We can’t produce everything the week of.”

The show is taped at a studio inside a former Bellevue fire station.

“We will start taking audience ticket requests shortly,” he said.

A live event is planned for early March. T-shirts are in the works.

“Pretty soon it will be April. The sun will come out and the mildew will go away and we’ll be on every week,” Chris Cashman said.

You might not have to wait until April.

“We might very well be in your back yard,” he said.

“Don’t be surprised when you see us on the street in Everett shooting a spoof. No one is safe!”

Andrea Brown; 425-339-3443; abrown@heraldnet.com

For more information:

www.facebook.com/the206tv

www.king5.com/on-tv/the-206

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