University of Washington Professor John Marzluff has spent 20 years researching crows and their complex behaviors. His recent work has examined how crows respond and react to the death of their comrades.

University of Washington Professor John Marzluff has spent 20 years researching crows and their complex behaviors. His recent work has examined how crows respond and react to the death of their comrades.

Thousands of crows darken Bothell’s sky, attracting scholars

  • Fri Apr 29th, 2016 11:16am
  • News

By Amy Nile Herald Writer

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University of Washington Bothell senior Bonnie Johnson (right) shows fellow biology student Maddy Fisher her illustrations, which depict various crow behaviors. Johnson and Fisher, along with other students in assistant professor Doug Wacker’s classes, have used the nearby crow roost as a chance to practice complex field research techniques.

University of Washington Bothell senior Bonnie Johnson (right) shows fellow biology student Maddy Fisher her illustrations, which depict various crow behaviors. Johnson and Fisher, along with other students in assistant professor Doug Wacker’s classes, have used the nearby crow roost as a chance to practice complex field research techniques.

Maddy Fisher, a senior at University of Washington Bothell, gazes up at thousands of crows flying to the campus to roost. “It’s kind of overwhelming, but in a good way,” Fisher said.

Maddy Fisher, a senior at University of Washington Bothell, gazes up at thousands of crows flying to the campus to roost. “It’s kind of overwhelming, but in a good way,” Fisher said.

Thousands of crows fly between Commons Hall (right) and Founders Hall (left) on the University of Washington Bothell campus at dusk.

Thousands of crows fly between Commons Hall (right) and Founders Hall (left) on the University of Washington Bothell campus at dusk.

A crow flies near the University of Washington Bothell campus. Research by University of Washington Professor John Marzluff and other staff has shown that crows can learn to recognize human faces.

A crow flies near the University of Washington Bothell campus. Research by University of Washington Professor John Marzluff and other staff has shown that crows can learn to recognize human faces.

Ursula Valdez, a University of Washington Bothell interdisciplinary arts and sciences lecturer, guides a student using a spotting scope to view crows coming in to roost.

Ursula Valdez, a University of Washington Bothell interdisciplinary arts and sciences lecturer, guides a student using a spotting scope to view crows coming in to roost.

Ray Hubbard, a junior at University of Washington Bothell, uses a spotting scope to observe crows flying near the school’s campus.

Ray Hubbard, a junior at University of Washington Bothell, uses a spotting scope to observe crows flying near the school’s campus.