Tulalip woman to appear in court in daughter’s death

TULALIP — A Tulalip woman is scheduled to make an initial court appearance Thursday in connection with the death of her toddler earlier this week.

The woman, 36, is being held for investigation of criminal endangerment and failure to support or care for a dependent person. She has not been charged.

The woman was arrested Monday night after her daughter, who was between 16 and 18 months old, was found not breathing in a car on the Tulalip Reservation.

The girl and her sister, who’s 2 1/2, both were rushed to the hospital in need of immediate medical care, according to tribal officials. The younger girl, identified by state social workers Tuesday as Chantel Craig, died.

The older sister remained at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Hospital officials on Wednesday said they could not provide additional details about her condition.

Chantel’s cause of death remains under investigation. Autopsy results could take weeks.

The tribes have not yet released additional information about the circumstances under which the girls were found.

Tribal investigators are working closely with FBI agents, who often lend assistance with investigations on tribal land, and the Children’s Administration branch of the state Department of Social and Health Services.

The woman was booked for offenses under tribal statutes, so documents detailing reasons for her arrest were not available under state records laws.

According to the Tulalip Tribal Codes posted online, a person can be convicted of criminal endangerment if they knowingly engage in conduct “that creates a substantial risk of death or serious bodily injury to another.”

An allegation of failure to support or care for a dependent person can involve refusing or neglecting to provide food, shelter or proper care or endangering a child’s health, welfare or emotional well-being.

Under tribal law, a conviction of criminal endangerment could lead to up to a year of imprisonment or a $5,000 fine.

Snohomish County prosecutors typically handle serious felony cases involving people living on the reservation, whether or not they are tribal members. As of Wednesday, county prosecutors were not involved in this case.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com

More in Local News

Herald photos of the week

A weekly collection of The Herald’s best images by staff photographers and… Continue reading

John Miller, congressman, author activist, has died

He was known for his dedication to the marine industry, energy and human rights.

Church takes a quiet, contemplative approach to worship

Alternative services at First Congregational Church of Maltby offer “a good deal of silence.”

Funds up for council vote would aid conservation district

District stands to receive an extra $1 million each year, if the County Council gives its approval.

Snohomish County hosts its annual Focus on Farming conference

The event features a trade show as well as talks on agriculture, jam-making and more.

Supportive housing for man accused in attacking his mother

Mental state impaired man’s ability to appreciate the wrongfulness of his actions, judge rules.

Lynnwood mayor challenged by councilman in general election

Three City Council members also are facing challengers on the Nov. 7 ballot.

‘Horrific’ child-porn case: Former Arlington man sentenced

Raymond Devore, arrested in 2015, had a cache of disturbing photos and video on his cellphone.

500 tires go up in flames at a store south of Everett

There were no injuries. And it was nowhere near as bad as that months-long tire fire in 1984.

Most Read