Tulalip woman to appear in court in daughter’s death

TULALIP — A Tulalip woman is scheduled to make an initial court appearance Thursday in connection with the death of her toddler earlier this week.

The woman, 36, is being held for investigation of criminal endangerment and failure to support or care for a dependent person. She has not been charged.

The woman was arrested Monday night after her daughter, who was between 16 and 18 months old, was found not breathing in a car on the Tulalip Reservation.

The girl and her sister, who’s 2 1/2, both were rushed to the hospital in need of immediate medical care, according to tribal officials. The younger girl, identified by state social workers Tuesday as Chantel Craig, died.

The older sister remained at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Hospital officials on Wednesday said they could not provide additional details about her condition.

Chantel’s cause of death remains under investigation. Autopsy results could take weeks.

The tribes have not yet released additional information about the circumstances under which the girls were found.

Tribal investigators are working closely with FBI agents, who often lend assistance with investigations on tribal land, and the Children’s Administration branch of the state Department of Social and Health Services.

The woman was booked for offenses under tribal statutes, so documents detailing reasons for her arrest were not available under state records laws.

According to the Tulalip Tribal Codes posted online, a person can be convicted of criminal endangerment if they knowingly engage in conduct “that creates a substantial risk of death or serious bodily injury to another.”

An allegation of failure to support or care for a dependent person can involve refusing or neglecting to provide food, shelter or proper care or endangering a child’s health, welfare or emotional well-being.

Under tribal law, a conviction of criminal endangerment could lead to up to a year of imprisonment or a $5,000 fine.

Snohomish County prosecutors typically handle serious felony cases involving people living on the reservation, whether or not they are tribal members. As of Wednesday, county prosecutors were not involved in this case.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com

More in Local News

Everett district relents on eminent domain moving expenses

Homeowners near Bothell still must be out by April to make way for a planned new high school.

Their grown children died, but state law won’t let them sue

Families are seeking a change in the state’s limiting wrongful-death law.

Shock from WSU suicide ripples through Snohomish County

Roughly 1 in 10 seniors, sophomores and 8th-graders said they had attempted to take their own lives.

Marysville hit-and-run leaves man with broken bones

The state patrol has appealed for help solving an increasing number of hit-and-runs in the state.

$1,000 reward for info on who killed an eagle near Snohomish

After being shot, the raptor was treated at the Sarvey Wildlife Center but died overnight.

Woman confronts man leaving house with stolen item

“He swung at her with a crowbar, missing her.”

Police seek suspect in Wells Fargo bank robbery

He was described as white, in his 30s, heavyset, with blonde hair and a maroon sweatshirt.

Possible bobcat sighting keeps Snohomish students inside

The creature was spotted on the campus of Valley View Middle School around noon.

Stabbing in Everett follows dispute between brothers-in-law

The victim, 54, was hospitalized. The suspect, 29, had not been apprehended Thursday.

Most Read