Tulalip woman to appear in court in daughter’s death

TULALIP — A Tulalip woman is scheduled to make an initial court appearance Thursday in connection with the death of her toddler earlier this week.

The woman, 36, is being held for investigation of criminal endangerment and failure to support or care for a dependent person. She has not been charged.

The woman was arrested Monday night after her daughter, who was between 16 and 18 months old, was found not breathing in a car on the Tulalip Reservation.

The girl and her sister, who’s 2 1/2, both were rushed to the hospital in need of immediate medical care, according to tribal officials. The younger girl, identified by state social workers Tuesday as Chantel Craig, died.

The older sister remained at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Hospital officials on Wednesday said they could not provide additional details about her condition.

Chantel’s cause of death remains under investigation. Autopsy results could take weeks.

The tribes have not yet released additional information about the circumstances under which the girls were found.

Tribal investigators are working closely with FBI agents, who often lend assistance with investigations on tribal land, and the Children’s Administration branch of the state Department of Social and Health Services.

The woman was booked for offenses under tribal statutes, so documents detailing reasons for her arrest were not available under state records laws.

According to the Tulalip Tribal Codes posted online, a person can be convicted of criminal endangerment if they knowingly engage in conduct “that creates a substantial risk of death or serious bodily injury to another.”

An allegation of failure to support or care for a dependent person can involve refusing or neglecting to provide food, shelter or proper care or endangering a child’s health, welfare or emotional well-being.

Under tribal law, a conviction of criminal endangerment could lead to up to a year of imprisonment or a $5,000 fine.

Snohomish County prosecutors typically handle serious felony cases involving people living on the reservation, whether or not they are tribal members. As of Wednesday, county prosecutors were not involved in this case.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com

More in Local News

Inslee’s budget solves school funding with help from carbon

His budget would use reserves to boost education, then replenish them with a carbon tax or fee.

Man, 29, injured by shots fired at Everett thrift store

The gunfire followed an argument in the parking lot of Value Village on Evergreen Way.

Police: He made an appointment, then tried to rob the bank

A lawyer is accused of donning a fake beard and telling a teller that a gunman was outside.

Lynnwood robbery leads to lockdown at Edmonds schools

Edmonds police said it was just a precaution as they search around Edmonds-Woodway High School.

Marysville 7-Eleven hit by armed robbers

Officers set up a perimeter and brought in a police dog, but the man couldn’t be found.

In adult court, four teens plead not guilty to murder

Prosecutors allege they worked together to plan and execute a drug robbery in Everett.

2 women struck, injured while crossing busy roads

The first happened Wednesday night in Everett. The second was Thursday morning in Edmonds.

Lives were on the line

After an estimated 350K emergency calls over 35 years, dispatcher Steve Williams is set to retire.

Drive-by shooting reported in Marysville neighborhood

Police said there was no evidence to indicate it was targeted at a specific person or property.

Most Read