Two arrested after break-in at Arlington post office

ARLINGTON — Police and U.S. postal inspectors are investigating two men in connection with a Thursday night break-in at the U.S. Post Office.

It was not a particularly sophisticated heist.

One of the suspects was found sleeping under a blanket beneath a covered porch outside a local church. Near his head was a grocery bag full of more than 100 pieces of stolen mail, court records said. Nearby was opened mail that included blank and pre-written bank checks as well as credit cards. Beside him was a foot-long pry bar police believe was used to open 101 post office boxes Thursday night.

In his pockets was a book of blank checks and Visa credit cards in other peoples’ names, according to court records.

Police arrested the suspect, 25, and another man, 21, on Thursday for investigation of mail theft, possessing stolen mail and unlawful possession of payment instruments, such as checks.

The older suspect told police he recently had been using heroin.

The men also are being investigated in connection with break-ins at the Arlington post office Feb. 15 and March 3.

In the first burglary, someone broke into 17 post office boxes and eight parcel boxes. The second burglary involved nine parcel boxes.

The post office burglaries don’t appear to be connected to a post office break-in in Sultan last month, officials said.

Investigators believe that someone broke in through an employee area in the back of the U.S. Post Office in Sultan on the night of Feb. 14 or morning of Feb. 15. Several items were thrown around and damaged and some packages were opened.

“We don’t suspect they are tied together,” U.S. Postal Inspection Service spokesman Dave Schroader said.

In the Sultan case, a reward of up to $10,000 is being offered for an arrest and conviction. The telephone number for tips is 877-876-2455.

Post office break-ins are rare, particularly when compared to overall mail theft, and they can be charged as a federal crime, Schroader said.

Federal and Snohomish County prosecutors will have to decide how to proceed with the Arlington cases, he said.

The investigation is continuing.

“We want to make sure all the players have been identified,” Schroader said.

Eric Stevick: 425-339-3446, stevick@heraldnet.com.

More in Local News

Bicycle tour raises money for dialysis patients

Volunteers also shared health information and put together care packages for homeless women.

Elderly couple escape serious injuries in crash with train

The driver drove down tracks instead of a road, hitting a slow-moving train near Stanwood.

Boeing reaches out to schools

Company employees helped Everett students at recent reading and Manufacturing Day events.

5-vehicle collision sends school bus into ditch; no injuries

No students were hurt when a school bus crashed into… Continue reading

Fire crew returns early from wildfires in Northern California

Four Everett firefighters returned from battling California wildfires late Thursday… Continue reading

Theft lands former insurance salesman 50 days in jail

A former insurance salesman is expected to report to jail… Continue reading

Pair of intrepid musicians climb N. Cascades summits to play

Rose Freeman and Anastasia Allison pack their instruments up mountains for high-altitude recitals.

Everett mayoral campaign is one of the priciest ever

Many campaign donors are giving to both Cassie Franklin and Judy Tuohy.

Herald columnist Julie Muhlstein (left) and Elizabeth Reed, of Snohomish, share something humorous during an interview at Reed’s Snohomish High School Class of 1942 reunion in September 2016. Muhlstein is marking 20 years as a columnist, with about 3,000 of them published in The Herald. Counting her early days as a reporter and editor, she has been with The Herald for 36 years. (Dan Bates / Herald file)
3,000 stories in 20 years: Here are some of my favorites

As a Daily Herald columnist, I’ve met remarkable people and learned much since 1997.

Most Read