Unusual tides expected this week; share your photos

The state Department of Ecology is asking the public to send photos of unusually high tides, or “king” tides, that are predicted for the coming week.

For inland waterways, king tides are predicted for Sunday through Wednesday and Jan. 14-17.

The high tides are expected to hit the Washington coast from Wednesday through Saturday, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca Wednesday through Friday.

Ecology officials suggest taking photos where the high water levels can be gauged against familiar landmarks such as sea walls, jetties, bridge supports or buildings. Keep a safe distance from rising water levels.

Note the date, time and location for each photo and upload the images on the Washington King Tide Photo Initiative Flickr Group at http://www.flickr.com/groups/1611274@N22/.

Since 2010, the ecology department has collected nearly 500 king tide photos from the public.

We’d also love to see your tide photos in the Herald reader galleries. Share them at www.heraldnet.com/yourphotos.

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