Vatican warns of pollution in Sistine Chapel

VATICAN CITY — The head of the Vatican Museums warned Thursday he might be forced to limit the number of visitors to the Sistine Chapel if its new air conditioning and air purification systems don’t significantly reduce “dangerous” pollution levels.

Antonio Paolucci told a conference that he was confident the new system, which is expected to be operational at the end of 2014, would curb the dust, humidity and carbon dioxide that are dulling and discoloring Michelangelo’s frescoed masterpiece.

But he warned: “If this project doesn’t work, I’ll be forced to impose a limited number (of visitors). But that would be a painful solution.”

Some 5.5 million people are expected to visit the Vatican Museums this year. During high season some 20,000 people a day enter the intimate Sistine Chapel, which was last restored in the 1990s. The numbers, which have increased three-fold in the past 30 years, mean a significant increase in the amount of humidity and dirt that are brought into the tiny space each day.

The aim of the air conditioning system, which has been donated by Carrier, a unit of United Technologies Corp., is to stabilize the pollution levels, with the maximum set at 800 particles per million. At its worst, the Sistine Chapel sometimes sees levels of pollution more than twice that, officials said.

Paolucci said he never wanted to see another major restoration done on the Sistine Chapel since they are so “traumatic” to the artworks themselves. The last one was criticized for having left the delicate frescoes brighter than Michelangelo ever would have wanted.

“There won’t be any more restorations,” he said. “But maintenance continues.”

More in Local News

Agencies launch coordinated response to an opioid ‘emergency’

Health workers, law enforcement agencies and emergency managers are responding as they might to a disaster.

Jordan Evers distributes coffee Sunday afternoon during the annual community meal at Carl Gipson Senior Center in Everett on November 19, 2017. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Firefighters serve Thanksgiving meals at Carl Gipson center

The next two feasts at the senior center in Everett will be Thanksgiving Day and Dec. 3.

Hiker rescued on Boulder River trail after 15-foot fall

She was reported to have possible leg and rib fractures.

Alleged philanderer attacked with hammer near Everett

His girlfriend had accused him of cheating and allegedly called on another man to confront him.

Snohomish County Council passes a no-new-taxes budget

The spending plan still funds the hiring of five new sheriff’s deputies and a code enforcement officer.

Darrington School Board race might come down to a coin flip

With a one-vote difference, a single ballot in Skagit County remains to be counted.

Front Porch

TREE LIGHTING EVENTS Several communities plan tree-lighting events to kick off the… Continue reading

Most Read