Who’s your Daddy? Pennsylvania gets it wrong

JOHNSTOWN, Pa. — About 500 new Pennsylvanians will get the wrong answer to the question “Who’s your Daddy?” if they rely on their misprinted birth certificates.

The Tribune-Democrat of Johnstown, bit.ly/VdqMmh,reports Tuesday that a computer glitch caused the problem when the state Division of Vital Records recently transitioned to new records software.

Spokeswoman Holli Senior says the problem affected about 500 birth certificates. The software was supposed to pull the fathers’ names from state records, but wound up pulling information from other areas of the birth records so the fathers’ names were incorrectly printed on the birth certificates.

The state’s permanent, computerized birth records are correct, however. Those with bollixed birth certificates have received a letter explaining the mix-up and instructions on how to get a corrected copy.

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