Woman pleads guilty in killings of Everett couple, two others

OREGON — An Oregon woman with ties to white supremacists pleaded guilty Tuesday to a criminal conspiracy that included the killings of an Everett couple and two other people.

Tuesday’s plea guarantees that Holly Grigsby, 27, will serve a life sentence behind bars.

In 2011, Grigsby and her boyfriend, David Joey Pedersen, traveled from Oregon to Everett, where his estranged father, David “Red” Pedersen lived with his wife, Leslie DeeDee Pedersen.

Joey Pedersen was accused of shooting his father, 56, once in the back of the head while he drove the young couple to the bus station in Everett.

Investigators believe the pair returned to the Everett couple’s home to kill Leslie DeeDee Pedersen, 69. Police found her bound with duct tape. Her throat had been slashed. The evidence suggested that Grigsby wielded the knives, court papers said.

The couple fled to Oregon, where they are accused of killing Cody Myers, 19, believing him to be Jewish. They also are accused of killing Reginald Clark, a disabled black man, in California.

The pair was indicted on federal racketeering charges that alleged that their violent criminal spree was an effort to “purify” and “preserve” the white race.

Federal authorities allege that the Oregon couple targeted Jewish leaders, members of prominent Jewish organizations and other “Zionists.” The pair used the media to publicize their hate-filled message in hopes of sparking a revolution, according to an indictment filed in 2012 in U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore.

Joey Pedersen, 33, pleaded guilty in Snohomish County to the killings here. Prosecutors declined to seek the death penalty after an investigation turned up “significant and credible” evidence that Red Pedersen had sexually abused his children and others decades ago.

Joey Pedersen went public with the allegations after his arrest, claiming the abuse was the motive behind killing his father. DeeDee Pedersen had nothing to do with the abuse, and wasn’t married to Red Pedersen at the time, prosecutors said.

Joey Pedersen already is serving two life sentences for the Everett killings. He is to be tried on federal charges in U.S. District Court in July. Attorney General Eric Holder decided not to seek the death penalty.

Grigsby pleaded guilty to the federal racketeering charges. Under the agreement, she will not be prosecuted in state courts here, Oregon or California.

Diana Hefley: 425-339-3463; hefley@heraldnet.com.

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