More killing is not the answer

The Cost of War Project estimates that retaliation associated with 9/11 has resulted in 330,000 deaths and a cost of $4 trillion. The majority of the deaths were civilian. Brown University and the Watson Institute estimate 134,000 civilian deaths in the Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom campaigns. United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan at one time reported that as many as 20,000 civilians could have been killed in the initial bombing of Afghanistan, but in the beginning no one was keeping track “of such things.”

Compared to the killing of civilians in the so-called Freedom campaigns, U.S. military casualties are insignificant. Now Syria? 1,429 civilians die as a result of a chemical attack that is surrounded by conflicting data. Are we going to kill 10,000 civilians in the process of stopping whoever killed the 1,429?

Rich Ekstedt

Marysville

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