Moving away isn’t a guarantee of safety

This is in response to the Sunday letter, “Crime chasing away lifelong residents”: I know first-hand that after becoming the victim of a crime it is hard to feel that you can trust anyone or anywhere again.

Compared to many places, the Everett area is still a very safe place to live. The crime rate in this area is still “manageable.”

I remember growing up in north Everett and not ever feeling the need to lock our home or cars. The rise in crime has changed all of that. We have to lock up everything and then still hope that we will be safe.

Short of moving to an isolated area, I cannot think of a safer area to live than here. There is no guarantee that moving away will keep your family or possessions safe. Crime has a way of finding all of us.

The best that we can do is to try our best to protect the things that we value as best as we can and hope that those who think that crime is the way to earn things find their victim somewhere else.

My hope for the letter writer is that she and her husband give Everett another try and let time distance them from the feeling of trust a lowlife took away from them.

Carol Whitney

Marysville

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