She understands the legislative process

Mary Margaret Haugen has served the citizens of the 10th Legislative District extremely well during her career in the state House of Representatives and the state Senate. Her knowledge of the issues, her dedication and passion for service make her one of the most effective senators in the state.

I have had the pleasure of meeting with Mary Margaret many times in the years that I have served on the Stanwood-Camano School District Board of Directors. During these meetings I have always been impressed with her knowledge of the issues, her willingness to meet with her constituents and her truthfulness.

I appreciate that Mary Margaret understands the legislative process, knows how to get things accomplished and never tells you anything but the truth. I often meet with politicians, local, state and federal level in my role on the school board. Mary Margaret stands out from almost all of the politicos because she never avoids an issue or tells us something that she thinks we might want to hear.

If something we are advocating is a good idea, she will support it and actively work for it. She also will explain the political realities and explain what the chances of our idea being adopted.

Mary Margaret, by her own admission, first went to Olympia (after serving on the Stanwood-Camano School Board) to be an advocate for education. She is still dedicated to education but has become the most influential member of the Senate on transportation issues. We need her expertise now more than ever as we face many challenges in these difficult economic times. We must continue to improve our infrastructure and must find a way to do so with dwindling resources.

I urge you join me in supporting Mary Margaret Haugen for state Senator. She has the experience, talent, dedication and expertise we need.

Roger Myers

Camano Island

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