What’s that you say?

Whoa, Reeboks? Sunday’s attempt at the Seattle Seahawks game to set a Guinness world record for “loudest crowd roar at a sports stadium” was successful. Guinness confirmed that, following a sack of the San Francisco quarterback, the crowd noise hit 131.9 decibles, beating the 131.76 decibles set at a soccer match in Turkey.

Coincidently, for next Sunday’s Seahawk game against Jacksonville, the first 30,000 fans will receive free Seahawk Miracle-Ear Hearing Aids in Seahawk Blue or Action Green.

The last honest man: A homeless Boston man is being praised for promptly turning in to police a backpack with $42,000 in cash and traveler’s checks that had been lost by a Chinese student.

The homeless man, however, disappointed President Barack Obama by turning down his nomination as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve.

Smile: Driven to become America’s biggest beer retailer, Wal-Mart is selling leading brands barely over its cost. The markup for a 36-pack of Coors Light was 0.6 percent, compared to a 30 percent markup for bottles of Coke.

We though Wal-Mart’s smiley face looked a little watery-eyed lately.

More in Opinion

Editorial cartoons for Sunday, Dec. 17

A sketchy look at the day in politics.… Continue reading

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The determination of Sandy Hook families to turn unfathomable tragedy into good must be honored.

Commentary: Region has to consider options for U.S. 2 trestle

Waiting for lawmakers to pass another gas tax isn’t an option. We have to move forward now.

Commentary: Tighter rein needed on opioid makers, distrbutors

Doctors are working to better control prescriptions, but that won’t be enough to stem the epidemic.

Parker: When ‘credibly accused’ replaces due process

Giving more weight to accusations may feel justified at some level, but this should give us pause.

Robinson: Trump was right — Alabama did the right thing

‘The people of Alabama will do the right thing,’ tweeted Trump. Sadly for him, they did just that.

Petri: Ending net neutrality means innovation of bad options

With net neutrality’s end, consumers can choose to get worse service unless they pay more. Hooray!

Will: Whirlpool has Washington in a protectionist spin cycle

The appliance maker wants a U.S. trade panel to impose a 50 percent tariff on imported machines.

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