Washington’s Seferian-Jenkins pleads guilty to DUI

SEATTLE — Washington tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins pleaded guilty Monday to a charge of driving under the influence stemming from his arrest after crashing his car in March.

Seferian-Jenkins made the guilty plea in Seattle Municipal Court during what was supposed to be a pre-trial hearing on his case. Seferian-Jenkins was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 suspended. Court records indicate Serferian-Jenkins is scheduled to serve his one day in jail on July 31. Washington begins fall camp on Aug. 5.

Whether Seferian-Jenkins will be on the practice field for the start of camp remains a question. He was suspended from team activities following his March arrest and coach Steve Sarkisian has not given indications of when Seferian-Jenkins will rejoin team activities or any punishment he might face.

A Washington athletic department spokesman said Monday no statement was expected from the school or Sarkisian about Seferian-Jenkins’ guilty plea. Washington opens the season on Aug. 31, hosting Boise State.

“I want everyone to know how sorry I am for the disappointment and embarrassment I have caused. I especially want to apologize to my teammates, my coaches and particularly my family,” Seferian-Jenkins said in a statement released by his attorney. “I also want to apologize to the entire University of Washington family for not living up to my expectations. I hope that everyone can learn from my mistake so that they do not commit the same lapse in judgment that I committed this part March.”

Last season, Seferian-Jenkins caught 69 passes for 850 yards — both single-season records for Washington tight ends — and seven touchdowns. He was one of three finalists for the Mackey Award given to the top tight end in the country and was named a third-team all-American by the AP.

He was arrested on March 9 following a late-night car accident. His blood-alcohol level was 0.18 percent, more than twice the state limit. A police report stated Seferian-Jenkins’ vehicle was found at the bottom of a catch basin at a park near the University of Washington. The driver objected to medical care, but was eventually placed on a backboard and transported to Harborview Medical Center. He objected to a blood test at the hospital before police obtained a search warrant to draw his blood.

Wearing a tan blazer and black tie, Seferian-Jenkins apologized during his statement to the court. Seferian-Jenkins’ attorney, William Kirk, noted his client chose to stop driving after his arrest and started walking most places, to which Judge Fred Bonner said, “That might be good for you.”

Before issuing his sentence, Bonner told Seferian-Jenkins that one thing he could do for the court is, “Talk to your teammates about what you have gone through.”

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