Flight Paths

Red targets on Mitsubishi aircraft still a mystery

Ryan Toews of J-Aircraft.com has been studying the markings of Zero aircraft for years. He worked with FHC staff to create all of the shapes,… Continue reading

Safety cable the key to landing gear retraction

Retracting the landing gear while your plane is still on the ground can ruin your day. The FHC’s Zero has a safety mechanism built in… Continue reading

70-year-old photo features Japanese Zero

Tracing the history of the FHC’s aircraft is always interesting. This photo came from the stacks at the U.S. National Archives. It shows one of… Continue reading

Sideways stabilizer makes for straight takeoff

An interesting aspect of the FHC’s Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-3 is the plane’s vertical stabilizer. Instead of being symmetrical, the stabilizer is built like a… Continue reading

P-40 and Zero will hit the skies together July 12

When you think of the Flying Tigers, you think of those shark-mouthed P-40s duking it out with squadrons of swarming Japanese Zero fighters, right? One… Continue reading

Iconic pair of WWII fighters to perform at SkyFair

Flying Heritage Collection’s SkyFair on July 26 will feature two of the most iconic WWII fighters not yet seen in the FHC’s stable of rare… Continue reading

Portholes light up cockpit of Polikarpov I-16

The Polikarpov I-16’s chubby fuselage contains, of course, room for the pilot in the cockpit area, situated over the wings. In order to keep the… Continue reading

Camo paint hid German aircraft in trees near end of WWII

In the last months of World War II, Allied aircraft were harassing German airfields heavily. As a result, many Luftwaffe units started operating from portions… Continue reading

Pair of WWII’s toughest planes to hit the skies June 28

The pair of aircraft scheduled to perform on the Flying Heritage Collection’s Ground Attack Day on June 28 are touted to be some of the… Continue reading

Dorsal fin stabilizes Mustang at high speeds

The Flying Heritage Collection’s Mustang has a dorsal fin fillet added in in front of the vertical stabilizer. This piece helps solidify yawing conditions at… Continue reading

Why the P-40 Tomahawk sweats oil

We were puzzled by the left side of the Curtiss P-40 Tomahawk — it sweats oil. All of the seams and rivets show the telltale… Continue reading

Cleaning down the barrel of a tank

Now that TankFest Northwest is over, it’s time for cleaning. Getting the guns and armor back into shape means lots of scrubbing, polishing and even… Continue reading

Distinctive hatches make T-34 tank easy to ID

As the Soviets worked to improve the T-34 tanks, one thing they changed were the hatches. Starting with the T-34/76D, the machines had a pair… Continue reading

Mustang was ‘suitable for aromatic fuels’

The data block on the Flying Heritage Collection’s P-51D Mustang includes the phrase “Suitable for Aromatic Fuels.” What? I thought all gasoline was smelly. Actually,… Continue reading

To each aircraft its own towbar

It shouldn’t be any surprise that airplanes of different nations made by different companies at different times have to be handled in different ways on… Continue reading

WWII fighter planes taking to the skies at SeaFair

This year, the FHC will be bringing four aircraft to perform over Lake Washington during SeaFair. The planes are some of the most important and… Continue reading

Flying Heritage Collection welcomes Scud missile carrier

One of the artifacts the Flying Heritage Collection recently obtained is a Scud ballistic missile carrier called a TEL (Tractor, Erector and Launcher). About 100… Continue reading

Old warbirds need a lot of time in the shop

Owning an old warbird is not all about showing it off at flying events and, as Maverick said, “Buzzing the tower.” There’s lots of mechanical… Continue reading

Lining up the P-51 Mustang’s gun sight and camera

Getting the gun camera and gun sight to point in exactly the right direction was important on a WWII fighter. Here’s how they did it… Continue reading

The arrival of the Hellcat

Until the arrival of the Grumman Hellcat, the Mitsubishi Zero was the undisputed king of the Pacific skies. But the little, nimble Japanese fighter was… Continue reading