From left, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, Economic Alliance of Snohomish County President and CEO Patrick Pierce, Port of Everett Chief Financial Officer John Carter and Tulalip Economic Development Corporation CEO Russell Steele speak on a panel during the Business Summit on Oct. 2. (Steven Powell / The Marysville Globe)

From left, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, Economic Alliance of Snohomish County President and CEO Patrick Pierce, Port of Everett Chief Financial Officer John Carter and Tulalip Economic Development Corporation CEO Russell Steele speak on a panel during the Business Summit on Oct. 2. (Steven Powell / The Marysville Globe)

Business booming in north county, summit participants told

Leaders talked about traffic, a water park, the port, Boeing, Paine Field and more.

By Steven Powell / The Marysville Globe

MARYSVILLE — Leaders of four major economic engines in north Snohomish County said at a Marysville-Tulalip Chamber of Commerce summit last week that business is booming.

At the Opera House, the leaders on Tuesday talked about some of the major projects they are working on, as well as some of the roadblocks they are facing.

City of Marysville

Mayor Jon Nehring talked about the Manufacturing Industrial Center and an I-5 interchange at 156th to deal with the traffic.

As for roadblocks, he said infrastructure is always a problem because it takes a long time to build and costs a lot of money. Nehring said the city has spent years planning for growth, and it’s exciting to see things come to fruition. He said partnerships have been key.

Nehring said there will be some congestion relief in 2019 when the I-5 shoulder will be available as an extra lane from north Everett to Marysville, followed soon after by Highway 529 on-ramps and off-ramps. Traffic relief “never happens ahead of time,” he said. “It’s not until the problem hits a critical stage.”

Nehring said unfunded mandates hurt development, adding that should be an issue in the Nov. 6 election.

Tulalip Economic Development Corp.

CEO Russell Steele talked about a planned water park that would be the largest in North America, with a 500-room hotel, a project which is up to five years away. He also talked about an Arlington cannabis lab that could move there. The Tulalip Tribes also are looking into an indoor lettuce farm.

Steele said he’s concerned about employment at the water park and other upcoming businesses because unemployment right now is so low — 3.5 percent. He said the Tulalip Resort Casino is short 120 workers because of the low jobless rate. He said the state Department of Transportation said it would need to raise gasoline taxes by $2.25 per gallon to do all the road work needed in the state.

Port of Everett

Chief Financial Officer John Carter said the port has the largest public marina on the West Coast and is the second-largest port in the state, behind Seattle-Tacoma. Two-thirds of its business is related to cargo and there is demand to take more and larger ships. The port is also developing the waterfront with four restaurants, a hotel and 260 apartments. It also hosts numerous Navy ships.

He said Army Corp of Engineers water regulations inhibit growth, as does the remediation required to rebuild old mill sites. Tariffs also are a concern, as Russia has been a key customer for shipping.

Carter said he’s excited about working with the growing business opportunities in the north county.

Carter said more agricultural products need to come here directly from Mexico, rather than going through California.

Economic Alliance Snohomish County

President and CEO Patrick Pierce talked about the need to convince Boeing to build its next aircraft model here. Supporting the “big guy,” he said, helps the many little guys who work with Boeing.

Pierce also expressed concern about tariffs. Lack of housing and trained workers are other concerns. He said he is excited about the Manufacturing Industrial Center bringing jobs here and allowing businesses to “escape the craziness of King County.”

He said he’s excited to build on Paine Field to make this area an even hotter destination. He said local children need to be taught the skills to get jobs here. And he’s excited about the new innovation center coming to Arlington.

Pierce said, “Congestion sucks, but it’s better than the alternative,” like economic demise in places like Detroit. “It’s a good problem to have.”

He said brownfield cleanup needs to be a priority. It not only cleans up the environment but puts the land back on the tax rolls.

“It’s a win-win, and it grows jobs,” he said.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Commercial Aircraft Interiors General Manager James Barnett stands in a warehouse aisle of 777 overhead bins at the company's new building on Monday, May 20, 2019 in Arlington, Wash. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
12 Snohomish County aero firms get $19M for job protection

The Aviation Manufacturing Jobs Protection grants could save 2,280 Washington jobs for up to six months.

FILE - The logo for Boeing appears on a screen above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday, July 13, 2021. Despite the pandemic's damage to air travel, Boeing says it's optimistic about long-term demand for airplanes. Boeing said Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021 that it expects the aerospace market to be worth $9 trillion over the next decade. That includes planes for airlines and military uses and other aerospace products and services. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, file)
Pandemic hasn’t dimmed Boeing’s rosy prediction for planes

The company is bullishly predicting a $9 trillion market over the next decade.

Washington August jobless rate was 5.1%; 16,800 jobs added

August’s rate was the same as July’s rate, and increased even as COVID-19 cases surge.

Boeing moving 150 jobs from Washington and California to Texas

The affected jobs are in the company’s global parts distribution unit.

School-age lead Emilee Swenson pulls kids around in a wagon at Tomorrow’s Hope child care center on Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2021 in Everett, Washington. A shortage of child care workers prompted HopeWorks, a nonprofit, to expand its job training programs. Typically, the programs help people with little or no work experience find a job. The new job training program is for people interested in becoming child care workers. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
HopeWorks to offer career training for child care workers

The Everett nonprofit hopes to train workers as child care centers struggle to hire staff.

Genna Martin / The Herald
David Barney, owner of Barney's Pastrami on Evergreen, has changed the last names of the dozens of celebrities who's photos hang on the wall of his restaurant to Barney.  The newly named celebrities include Humphrey Barney, Uma Barney, Marilyn Barney, Olivia Newton-Barney and Stevie Ray Barney.  
Photo taken 11252014
Where’s Barney? His pastrami shop has served its last hoagie

Even the Evergreen Way deli’s landlord is looking for him. David Barney has vanished.

Tasty and healthy asian food - spicy ramen with wheat noodle, meat, eggs and onion in white pot with chopsticks. Vector illustration of traditional korean cuisine for menu, recipe books or printing
You voted: The best Vietnamese food in Snohomish County

Even during a pandemic, folks still have their favorites.

‘Fulfillment center’ proposed along Bothell Everett Highway

Amazon denies that it’s involved in the project. But permitting documents include the company name.

A drawing of the giant Funko Pop! balloon depicting Baby Yoda, which will wind through the streets of New York during this year’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. (Funko) 20210912
It’s OK to Pop! this balloon: Funko to join the Macy’s parade

Funko’s incarnation of Baby Yoda will float by in this year’s Thanksgiving Day event.

Most Read