Joel Sacks, director of the Washington state Department of Labor and Industries, poses for a photo Wednesday in his office in Tumwater next to a an information sheet showing how more than 250,000 workers in Washington state would be newly eligible for overtime pay by 2026 under a rule proposed Wednesday by L&I. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Joel Sacks, director of the Washington state Department of Labor and Industries, poses for a photo Wednesday in his office in Tumwater next to a an information sheet showing how more than 250,000 workers in Washington state would be newly eligible for overtime pay by 2026 under a rule proposed Wednesday by L&I. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

More Washington workers could see OT pay under proposed rule

Currently, salaried employees that are paid more than $23,660 per year are exempt from overtime pay.

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