An artist’s conception shows the proposed Northline Village development in Lynnwood. (Merlone Geier Partners)

An artist’s conception shows the proposed Northline Village development in Lynnwood. (Merlone Geier Partners)

Northline Village’s phase one coming to Lynnwood in 2024

First phase could include housing, retail and office space, or a combination of those.

LYNNWOOD — One of the biggest developments coming to Lynnwood is set to open in 2024 — kind of.

New images and a video rendering released last week offer an updated glimpse into Northline Village, a 17-acre development across the street from the incoming Link light rail station, which begins service in 2024. The project includes 1,370 housing units, seven-story office buildings and retail space for restaurants, cafes, a movie theater, gym and grocery store.

There’s no scheduled start date for construction, but builders need to break ground by 2022 to open “phase one” alongside light rail, said Jamas Gwilliam, vice president of development for Merlone Geier Partners, a West Coast developer leading the project.

What “phase one” means is still unclear, Gwilliam said.

“It depends on the market demand for the different product types we’re offering,” he said. “It could include any combination (of residential, office or retail space).”

One of the world’s largest commerical real estate and investment firms, Coldwell Banker Richard Ellis, is responsible for leasing the 500,000 square feet of office space.

Those contracts are getting squared away now so companies hoping to move in can offer input on design, Gwilliam said.

Next comes housing units and retail.

Merlone Geier Partners is handling leases for shops and restaurants.

Several multi-family housing groups are in the mix to manage the dwellings, but none have been chosen, Gwilliam said.

When the city council approved the development agreement for Northline Village in December, Councilmember George Hurst said the city ought to require some low- to moderate-income housing.

The deal doesn’t do that, but Merlone Geier still could include affordable housing, Gwilliam said.

Northline Village could be the second project to use the city’s multi-family housing tax exemption, following Kinect@Lynnwood, a 239-unit development set to open in 2022.

To qualify for the tax break, at least 20% of units must be for low- to moderate-income households. For Northline Village, that’d be 274.

“We’re still really early in that process,” Gwilliam said. “There will be the opportunity to use the (tax exemption) program. We’re seeing that being widely used in other developments we’ve worked on. We are not at all suggesting that there won’t be affordable housing at this project.”

Low income means anyone earning less than 80% of the median household income. Moderate income refers to individuals or families making between 80% and 115% of the median household income.

In Snohomish County, the median household income is $87,000.

Joey Thompson: 425-339-3449; jthompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @byjoeythompson.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Virus humbles once-thriving restaurants in Snohomish County

Grace Correa lost her marriage, home and business. She invested in a new restaurant. Then came COVID-19.

‘Essential’ businesses: Florists, boat sellers and toy makers

Interpretations of the governor’s stay-home order are many, and some strain credulity.

Boeing extends temporary shutdown of Puget Sound plants

The company had planned to reopen on Wednesday. About 60 Everett employees have tested positive.

Ride the Ducks Seattle files for bankruptcy after closing

The tourist attraction never recovered financially after a 2015 crash that killed five and injured 60

Boeing takes new blow with Avolon scrapping $8 billion order

The plane-leasing company will also defer delivery of 25 Boeing and Airbus narrow-bodies.

Key system on Boeing’s KC-46 tanker needs a complete redesign

The change in the Everett-built airplane involves a remote vision system used for aerial refueling.

Boeing to offer buyouts, weighs wide-body production cuts

The buyouts would keep a $60 billion bailout option viable. Forced layoffs would complicate that effort.

What’s essential? Cannabis, and sales are brisk in Washington

Pot shops stay open amid COVID-19, with curbside pickup. And stimulus checks are coming soon.

Jobless claims soar in county, state amid COVID-19

Across the nation, number of filings for unemployment benefits surged to 6.6 million

Aviation pioneer, innovator and entrepreneur Joe Clark dies

He is the man most responsible for those elegant upswept wingtips now standard on new Boeing 737s.

Uncharted territory: The questions for businesses are many

Life and commerce might never be the same when the coronavirus outbreak subsides.

Closed Edmonds car lot dodged hundreds of thousands in taxes

For years, Kero’s Auto Brokers greatly underreported its sales, and how much it owed the state.